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  • Art & Science

  • Events 

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  • Past Events

    Wednesday, June 29, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Did Einstein Kill Schrödinger's Cat? A Quantum State of Mind

    Featuring: Daniel Harlow (Harvard University Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature), Scott Aaronson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Brian Swingle (Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics)
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    Recent research suggests that quantum information and entanglement of quantum states—a term coined by Schrödinger to describe "spooky action at a distance" between quantum particles in his letters to Einstein in which he also proposed his famous thought experiment, Schrödinger's cat, to illustrate quantum superposition—may be key to understanding quantum gravity, one of the greatest unsolved problems of modern physics. Physicists are now wrestling with another paradox thought experiment that describes the fate of quantum states at the event horizon of a black hole and may upend some of the time-tested fundamental theories. This panel will discuss the fascinating interplay between two great theories of the 20th century—quantum theory and general relativity—and how these phenomena may be exploited, from black holes to quantum computing.

    Monday, June 13, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Are We Alone in the Universe?

    Featuring: Adam Frank (University of Rochester), Louisa Preston (astrobiologist and author), Jason Thomas Wright (Pennsylvania State University), and Stephen M. Gardiner (University of Washington)
    Moderator: Ira Flatow (PRI's Science Friday®)

    The Fermi Paradox—the apparent contradiction between the high probability of the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations and the lack of contact with such civilizations—continues to captivate our minds. Join our panel of leading physicists and philosophers as they explore the question: "Where is everybody?" as well as other questions: How does scientific knowledge direct our future scientific and technological pursuits on Earth and in space? How does science inform human ethics? Does science make us better citizens of the universe?

    Monday, May 23, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    The Rise of Human Consciousness

    Featuring: David Chalmers (Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness, New York University), Michael Graziano (Princeton University), Hod Lipson (Columbia University) and Max Tegmark (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    Advances in physical and information sciences, biology, and neuroscience have dramatically enhanced our knowledge of the human species. But can physical sciences solve the biggest mystery—the emergence of human consciousness? Join our panel to explore this question and its implications.

    Monday, May 9, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Complexity: A Science of the Future?

    Featuring: Bernard Chazelle (The Discrepancy Method: Randomness and Complexity), Marcelo Gleiser (A Tear at the Edge of Creation), and Geoffrey West (Santa Fe Institute)
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    The advent of sophisticated computer technology has allowed studies of complex systems such as cell colonies, neurons in the brain, the immune system, economic markets, and social groups. In complex systems, simple, nonlinear interactions are iterated over time and give rise to self-organization, evolution, learning, and adaptation—phenomena that eluded explanation until now. This panel, including selected physicists, will explore whether studies of complexity complement traditional physics or may upend science as we know it.

  • Publications 

    Annals

    The Neurosciences and Music V: Cognitive Stimulation and Rehabilitation

    Edited by Emmanuel Bigand (University of Bourgogne), Barbara Tillmann (Lyon Neuroscience Research Center), Isabelle Peretz (University of Montreal), Robert J. Zatorre (McGill University), Luisa Lopez (University of Rome), and Maria Majno (Pierfranco and Luisa Mariani Foundation)

    This Annals volume highlights neuroscience research on the unique contributions of music to programs of cognitive stimulation and rehabilitation, including music-based interventions for neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease.

    Volume 1337

    eBriefing

    Gluttony: Deconstructing Dinner

    Moderator: Dan Pashman (Journalist)
    Panelists: Steve Ettlinger (Author) and Dwight Eschliman (Photographer)

    Steve Ettlinger and Dwight Eschliman described their investigation of the ingredients in processed foods and discussed their upcoming book, Foodstuff, at the finale of the Academy's Science and the Seven Deadly Sins series.

    eBriefing

    Sloth: Is Your City Making You Fat?

    Moderator: Tom Vanderbilt (Author)
    Panelists: Mariela Alfonzo (Polytechnic Institute at New York University), Kaid Benfield (Natural Resources Defense Council), and Hunter Reed (FAST NYC)

    As part of the Academy's Science and the Seven Deadly Sins series, a panel discussed urban design in NYC and explored how the built environment affects public health.

    eBriefing

    Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, and Islamic Studies Research: Qatar Foundation Annual Research Forum 2011

    Panelists: Richard Charkin (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, UK), Nader Ardalan (Harvard University & Ardalan Associates, LLC), Mostafa Kharoufi (Economic and Social Council), and Ali Mohayuddin Qaradaghi (Qatar University)

    This eBriefing highlights humanities and social sciences research presented at the Qatar Foundation Annual Research Forum. Topics include civic engagement, urbanization, demography, public health, public administration, education, communications, cultural analysis, Islamic jurisprudence and much more.