• Events 

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  • Past Events

    Thursday, November 19, 2015 | 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM

    Little Beans, Big Opportunities: Realizing the Potential of Pulses to Meet Today's Global Health Challenges

    Speakers: Seth Adu-Afarwuah (University of Ghana), Vincent Amanor-Boadu (Kansas State University), Richard Black (PepsiCo), Laurette Dubé (McGill University), Allan Hruska (United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization), PK Joshi (International Food Policy Research Institute), Mark J Manary (Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis), Danielle Nierenberg (Food Tank), Sonny Ramaswamy (USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture), John L. Sievenpiper (University of Toronto), Joanne Slavin (University of Minnesota)

    This inaugural conference will look at the role of pulses in healthy and sustainable diets, examine how pulses can make critical contributions to public health, and explore opportunities for enhancing these benefits broadly through food system innovations.

    Friday, October 16, 2015 | 8:30 AM - 5:15 PM

    Towards Evidence-based Nutrition and Obesity Policy: Methods, Implementation, and Political Reality

    Keynote Speakers: Sonia Angell (New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene), Rogan Kersh (Wake Forest University)
    Speakers: Eliza Barclay (NPR), Sanjay Basu (Stanford University), Julia Belluz (, Jason P. Block (Harvard Medical School), Juan Angel Rivera Dommarco (National Institute of Public Health, Mexico), Helena Bottemiller Evich (Politico), Matthew Harding (Duke University), Terry Huang (CUNY School of Public Health), Nancy Huehnergarth (Nancy F. Huehnergarth Consulting), Barbara Laraia (University of California Berkeley), Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)

    Well-informed nutrition policy decisions which consider scientific evidence should strive for effective policies that improve health outcomes on a large scale. This one-day conference will focus on emerging research methodology, how to interpret research outcomes and how these can be used to inform policy.

    Friday, June 19, 2015 | 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM

    Microbes in the City:
    Mapping the Urban Genome

    Speakers: Joel Ackelsberg (NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene), Eric Alm (Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Martin J. Blaser (New York University Langone Medical Center), Ilana Brito (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Jane Carlton (New York University Center for Genomics and Systems Biology), Rumi Chunara (New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering), Laurie Garrett (Council on Foreign Relations), Jack Gilbert (Argonne National Laboratory), Jo Handelsman (White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), Curtis Huttenhower (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), W. Ian Lipkin (Center for Infection and Immunity, Columbia University), Juan Maestre (The University of Texas at Austin), Christopher Mason (Institute for Computational Biomedicine, Weill Cornell Medical College), Paula Olsiewski (Alfred P. Sloan Foundation), Rachel Poretsky (University of Illinois at Chicago), Coby Schal (North Carolina State University Department of Entomology)

    Efforts to map all of the genetic information of microbial communities that make up the urban genome—from kiosks and subways, to soil and sewage—seek to improve the health and productivity of the built environments in which we live.

    May 14 - 15, 2015 | Spain

    Human Health in the Face of Climate Change: Science, Medicine, and Adaptation

    Speakers and Session Chairs: Matthew Baylis (University of Liverpool), Jose A. Centeno (The Joint Pathology Center, US Department of Defense), Peter John Diggle (Lancaster University), Kristie L. Ebi (University of Washington), Carlos Pérez García-Pando (International Research Institute for Climate and Society, Columbia University), Elisabet Lindgren (Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University), George Luber (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), Jane Olwoch (University of Pretoria), Mercedes Pascual (University of Chicago), Richard Paul (Institut Pasteur), A. Townsend Peterson (The University of Kansas), Jan C. Semenza (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)), Jeffrey Shaman (Columbia University), Cassandra De Young (UN Food and Agricultural Organization)

    Discover the latest research on climate change and its effects on human health, including vulnerability due to extreme weather events, land-use change and agricultural production, variable epidemiology of parasites and infectious diseases, and climate-altering pollutants.

  • Publications 


    The Year in Ecology and Conservation Biology

    Edited by Alison G. Power (Cornell University) and Richard S. Ostfeld (Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies)

    The eigth installment of this annual scholarly series of reviews in ecology and conservation biology


    Human Health in the Face of Climate Change: Science, Medicine, and Adaptation

    Keynote Speakers: Christopher Dye (World Health Organization) and Elisabet Lindgren (Stockholm University, Sweden)

    This eBriefing explores health risks associated with climate change and strategies for adapting to its effects.


    Frontiers in Agricultural Sustainability: Studying the Protein Supply Chain to Improve Dietary Quality

    Keynote Speaker: Barbara Burlingame (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

    This eBriefing looks at how to improve the protein supply chain, especially through programs designed to increase access to a high-quality diet for malnourished populations.


    Sloth: Is Your City Making You Fat?

    Moderator: Tom Vanderbilt (Author)
    Panelists: Mariela Alfonzo (Polytechnic Institute at New York University), Kaid Benfield (Natural Resources Defense Council), and Hunter Reed (FAST NYC)

    As part of the Academy's Science and the Seven Deadly Sins series, a panel discussed urban design in NYC and explored how the built environment affects public health.