• Physics

  • Featured Event

    Green Buildings and Health: From the Lab to the Real World

    Wednesday, December 14, 2016 | 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    The New York Academy of Sciences

    Researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and SUNY Upstate Medical University present the results of a new study showing that employees in high-performing, green-certified buildings had higher cognitive function test scores than those in similarly high-performing buildings that were not green certified, even after controlling for other potential explanatory factors.

  • Events 

    No events are scheduled in this topic at this time. Click the RSS icon above and bookmark our RSS feed to learn about future events.
  • Past Events

    Wednesday, June 29, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Did Einstein Kill Schrödinger's Cat? A Quantum State of Mind

    Featuring: Daniel Harlow (Harvard University Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature), Scott Aaronson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), and Brian Swingle (Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics)
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    Recent research suggests that quantum information and entanglement of quantum states—a term coined by Schrödinger to describe "spooky action at a distance" between quantum particles in his letters to Einstein in which he also proposed his famous thought experiment, Schrödinger's cat, to illustrate quantum superposition—may be key to understanding quantum gravity, one of the greatest unsolved problems of modern physics. Physicists are now wrestling with another paradox thought experiment that describes the fate of quantum states at the event horizon of a black hole and may upend some of the time-tested fundamental theories. This panel will discuss the fascinating interplay between two great theories of the 20th century—quantum theory and general relativity—and how these phenomena may be exploited, from black holes to quantum computing.

    Monday, June 13, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Are We Alone in the Universe?

    Featuring: Adam Frank (University of Rochester), Louisa Preston (astrobiologist and author), Jason Thomas Wright (Pennsylvania State University), and Stephen M. Gardiner (University of Washington)
    Moderator: Ira Flatow (PRI's Science Friday®)

    The Fermi Paradox—the apparent contradiction between the high probability of the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations and the lack of contact with such civilizations—continues to captivate our minds. Join our panel of leading physicists and philosophers as they explore the question: "Where is everybody?" as well as other questions: How does scientific knowledge direct our future scientific and technological pursuits on Earth and in space? How does science inform human ethics? Does science make us better citizens of the universe?

    Monday, May 23, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    The Rise of Human Consciousness

    Featuring: David Chalmers (Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness, New York University), Michael Graziano (Princeton University), Hod Lipson (Columbia University) and Max Tegmark (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    Advances in physical and information sciences, biology, and neuroscience have dramatically enhanced our knowledge of the human species. But can physical sciences solve the biggest mystery—the emergence of human consciousness? Join our panel to explore this question and its implications.

    Monday, May 9, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Complexity: A Science of the Future?

    Featuring: Bernard Chazelle (The Discrepancy Method: Randomness and Complexity), Marcelo Gleiser (A Tear at the Edge of Creation), and Geoffrey West (Santa Fe Institute)
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    The advent of sophisticated computer technology has allowed studies of complex systems such as cell colonies, neurons in the brain, the immune system, economic markets, and social groups. In complex systems, simple, nonlinear interactions are iterated over time and give rise to self-organization, evolution, learning, and adaptation—phenomena that eluded explanation until now. This panel, including selected physicists, will explore whether studies of complexity complement traditional physics or may upend science as we know it.

  • Publications 


    The Physics of Everything

    Is there a limit to human knowledge? Where do philosophy and physics intersect? Are we alone in the universe? Answering these and other questions, this six-part series united some of our most vibrant public intellectuals and communicators for explorations that reflect on the current state of modern physical sciences, its greatest mysteries and future endeavors, and its philosophical significance for our understanding of reality and the spiritual dimension of human existence.


    Beyond the Big Bang: Searching for Meaning in Contemporary Physics

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals volume presents papers from a three-part series, in collaboration with the Nour Foundation, on the relevance of modern-day physics to perennial questions confronting human existence.

    Volume 1361


    Annals Reports

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals volume presents discussions ofnutrition and the science of disease prevention; designing optogenetically controlled RNA for regulating biological systems; and how ion channels sense mechanical force

    Volume 1352


    Flow of Time

    Edited by Dean Rickles and Maria Kon (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia)

    This Annals volume explores the nature of time's passage from a variety of perspectives, including from mathematics and physics to linguistics and cognitive science.

    Volume 1326