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  • Events 

    Friday, October 16, 2015 | 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

    Towards Evidence-based Nutrition and Obesity Policy: Methods, Implementation, and Political Reality

    Keynote Speakers: Sonia Angell (New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene), Rogan Kersh (Wake Forest University)
    Speakers: Eliza Barclay (NPR's Salt), Sanjay Basu (Stanford Prevention Research Center), Jason Block (Harvard Medical School), Juan Rivera Dommarco (Research Center in Nutrition and Health, National Institutes of Public Health), Matthew Harding (Duke Sanford School for Public Policy), Terry Huang (CUNY School of Public Health), Nancy Huehnergarth (Nancy F. Huehnergarth Consulting), Barbara A. Laraia (Berkeley School of Public Health), Jeff Niederdeppe (Cornell University)

    Well-informed nutrition policy decisions which consider scientific evidence should strive for effective policies that improve health outcomes on a large scale. This one-day conference will focus on emerging research methodology, how to interpret research outcomes and how these can be used to inform policy.

  • Past Events

    Saturday, May 9, 2015 | 8:45 AM - 3:00 PM

    23rd Annual Pace University Psychology Conference

    To submit for a poster or oral presentation, go to http://www.pacepsychologyconference.net. Then, click on the link called Proposal Submission.

    Tuesday, November 11, 2014 | 5:45 PM - 7:00 PM

    Baby Talk: Closing the Achievement Gap, Word by Word

    Moderator: Michael H. Levine (Executive Director, the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop)
    Panelists: Patricia K. Kuhl (Co-Director, Institute for Learning and Behavioral Sciences (ILABS), University of Washington; Co-author, "The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind."), Patti Miller (Director, Too Small to Fail Initiative for the Clinton Foundation), Dana Suskind (Director, Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program at the University of Chicago and Founder and Director, Thirty Million Words Initiative)

    By the time they are 3, children from low-income families hear 30 million fewer words than their high-income peers. Join us for a public panel discussion on early childhood development and strategies to boost school readiness for all children.

    November 11 - 13, 2014

    Shaping the Developing Brain: Prenatal through Early Childhood
    Fifth Annual Aspen Brain Forum

    Keynote Speaker:Thomas R. Insel (National Institute of Mental Health)
    Speakers: Tracy L. Bale (University of Pennsylvania), Jay Belsky (University of California, Davis), Maureen Black (University of Maryland), Pia Britto (UNICEF), Serena Counsell (King's College London), Martha Farah (University of Pennsylvania), Edward Frongillo (University of South Carolina), Michael Georgieff (University of Minnesota), Takao Hensch (Harvard University), Sharon Lynn Kagan (Columbia University), Patricia Kuhl (Washington University), Ed Lein (Allen Institute for Brain Science), Betsy Lozoff (University of Michigan), Linda Mayes (Yale School of Medicine), Andrew N. Meltzoff (Washington University), Charles A. Nelson (Harvard University and Boston Children's Hospital), Joseph Piven (UNC School of Medicine, CIDD), Dana Suskind (University of Chicago), Nim Tottenham (UCLA)

    Discover the latest cognitive neuroscience research on infant and early childhood development; social, family, and nutritional factors that cause lasting changes to the brain; and intervention, education, and policy to help at-risk children.

    Tuesday, April 8, 2014 | 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

    Snownado: Surviving Frozen Science

    Speakers: Samuel Bowser (New York State Department of Health's Wadsworth Center), Julie Chase (The Explorers Club), Trevor Deighton, Linda Gormezano (American Museum of Natural History)

    Frigid, dark, and wet, the poles challenge life with some of the most formidable environments on the planet. Learn from intrepid explorers what drives them to undertake fieldwork in punishing conditions, and what happens when things go wrong.

  • Publications 

    Annals

    Affective Disorders and Traumatic Brain Injury: Qatar Clinical Neuroscience Conference

    Edited by Matthew E. Fink (Weill Cornell Medical College), Jack D. Barchas (Weill Cornell Medical College), and Javaid I. Sheikh (Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar)

    Discussions of the latest translational research, advanced brain imaging, & novel diagnostics

    Annals

    Translational Neuroscience in Psychiatry: Light at the End of the Tunnel

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals volume discusses progress in neuroscience that translates to new treatments for psychiatric illness, with a focus on progress in developing quantitative endpoints to measure disease progression and response to therapy in depression and schizophrenia.

    Volume 1344

    Annals

    Competitive Visual Processing Across Space and Time: Attention, Memory, and Prediction

    Edited by Werner X. Schneider (Bielefeld University), Wolfgang Einhäuser (Bielefeld University and Philipps-University Marburg), and Gernot Horstmann (Bielefeld University)

    This Annals volume explores three memory-related aspects of competitive visual processing: interactions of attention and working memory, attention and long-term memory, and attention and prediction.

    Volume 1339

    Annals

    The Year in Neurology and Psychiatry

    Edited by Daniel H. Geschwind (University of California, Los Angeles)

    Scholarly reviews of topics in neurology and psychiatry--a new Annals series.

  • Podcasts

    A recent conference held at the Academy asked a downright outrageous question: Can dementia be prevented by making changes to your diet? In this podcast we look at what the answers might be.

    Download (87 MB, 38:11)

    In the second of a two-part series, experts look at the links between health and nutrition. They examine everything from how nutrition impacts hospital stays, to cancer and aging, to developing food science innovations, and improving diet.

    Download (45 MB, 19:56)

    In this first of a two-part series, experts from various sectors explore the available options to reduce "hidden hunger"—micronutrient deficiencies in a population.

    Download (71 MB, 31:13)