• Events 

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  • Past Events

    September 30 - October 1, 2015

    Mobile Health: The Power of Wearables, Sensors, and Apps to Transform Clinical Trials

    Keynote Speaker: Ian Ferguson (ARM), Christian Stammel (Wearable Technologies AG)
    Speakers: Pam Baker (FierceBigData), Stan Berkow (Sense Health), Brian Bot (Sage Bionetworks), Michelle De Mooy (Consumer Privacy Project at Center for Democracy and Technology), Glen de Vries (Medidata), John Hixson (University of California at San Francisco), Julian Jenkins (GlaxoSmithKline), David C. Magnus (Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics), Linda A. Malek (Moses and Singer, LLP), John Mastrototaro (Medtronic), Veena Misra (The NSF Nanosystems Engineering Research Center (NERC) for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST) and North Carolina State University), Bernard Munos (FasterCures [a center of the Milken Institute]), Fiorenzo Omenetto (Tufts University), Aydogan Ozcan (UCLA and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute), Tomasz Sablinski (Transparency Life Sciences), Leonard Sacks (U.S. Food and Drug Administration), Pei Wang (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)

    Continuous health monitoring using wearable sensors, mobile devices, and apps is becoming a powerful tool for assessing critical physiological parameters. The vast accumulation of real-time biometric data obtained from these technologies may hold invaluable clues for treating some of the most devastating human diseases.

    Tuesday, September 29, 2015 | 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Visualizing Cellular Messengers

    Speakers: Samie R. Jaffrey (Weill Cornell Medical College), Amy E. Palmer (University of Colorado)

    This symposium features state of the art chemical tools and imaging strategies for metal ions, redox signaling species, and metabolites in the cell, cellular delivery and targeting approaches, and their application to studying life processes.

    Thursday, June 18, 2015 | 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM

    Quantitative Biology:
    From Molecules to Man

    Keynote Speaker: Steve Kay (University of Southern California)
    Speakers: Francis J. Doyle III (University of California Santa Barbara), Andrew Ewald, PhD (Johns Hopkins University), Scott E. Fraser (University of Southern California), Peter Kuhn (University of Southern California), Christopher E. Mason (Weill Cornell Medical College), Paul Newton (University of Southern California), Amanda Randles (Harvard University), Chris Sander (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)

    Quantitative Biology: From Molecules to Man will bring together professionals in science, medicine, and engineering to articulate a vision for the future of improving patient health outcomes.

    Monday, May 18, 2015 | 11:30 AM - 5:00 PM

    Chemical Biology Discussion Group Year-End Symposium

    Keynote Speaker: Scott J. Miller (Yale University)

    The Chemical Biology Discussion Group brings together chemists and biologists interested in discussing the latest breakthroughs. The year-end meeting features keynote speaker Scott J. Miller of Yale University and a poster session.

  • Publications 


    Annals Reports

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals volume presents discussions ofnutrition and the science of disease prevention; designing optogenetically controlled RNA for regulating biological systems; and how ion channels sense mechanical force

    Volume 1352


    Building the Knowledge Base for Climate Resiliency: New York City Panel on Climate Change 2015 Report

    Cynthia Rosenzweig and William Solecki, Editors

    Increasing resiliency of New York City to a range of climate risks in the coming decades


    Click Chemistry in Biology and Medicine

    Organizers: Peng Wu (Albert Einstein College of Medicine) and Jennifer Henry (formerly at The New York Academy of Sciences)
    Keynote Speakers: Jim Paulson (Scripps Research Institute) and K. Barry Sharpless (Scripps Research Institute)

    This eBriefing explores recent developments in the search for click reactions with applications in disease diagnosis and therapy.


    Flow of Time

    Edited by Dean Rickles and Maria Kon (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia)

    This Annals volume explores the nature of time's passage from a variety of perspectives, including from mathematics and physics to linguistics and cognitive science.

    Volume 1326

  • Podcasts

    Understanding nutrition's impact on health requires an intricate knowledge of all the different systems within the human body. Learn how a systems approach to nutrition could change the field.

    Download (44 MB, 32:02)

    A recent conference held at the Academy asked a downright outrageous question: Can dementia be prevented by making changes to your diet? In this podcast we look at what the answers might be.

    Download (87 MB, 38:11)

    In the second of a two-part series, experts look at the links between health and nutrition. They examine everything from how nutrition impacts hospital stays, to cancer and aging, to developing food science innovations, and improving diet.

    Download (45 MB, 19:56)
  • Webinar Archives

    Webinar Archive
    November 21, 2009

    Gotham-Metro Condensed Matter Meeting

    Graduate students from around the New York metropolitan area recently organized a symposium spotlighting some of the most exciting local work in soft and hard condensed matter physics. This webinar archive collects all the presentations.

    Webinar Archive
    April 28, 2009

    Protein Kinases: Structure-Guided Drug Discovery

    Protein kinases play a key role in almost every major pathway in eukaryotic cells. Structural approaches, including a new method called fragment-based drug design, are identifying potential targets against diseases including cancer.

    Webinar Archive
    April 22, 2009

    Zero Net Energy Buildings: Reality or Fiction?: Recommendations from the WBCSD Report

    Green architects and engineers are working to balance energy consumption and generation at the level of individual buildings. But how do we define "zero" energy, and how can we reach this goal?