Comments*

 
  • Events 

    Friday, September 18, 2015 | 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

    Alzheimer's Disease and Tau: Pathogenic Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches

    Speakers: George S. Bloom (University of Virginia), Peter Davies (Feinstein Institute for Medical Research), Marc I. Diamond (University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center), Michael Hutton (Eli Lilly and Company), Khalid Iqbal (New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities), Hartmuth C. Kolb (Johnson & Johnson, Janssen R&D), Nicole Leclerc (Université de Montréal), Richard Ransohoff (Biogen)

    Speakers at this symposium will address novel tau-centered mechanisms of neurodegeneration and new therapeutic approaches for many devastating neurological disorders.

    Tuesday, October 27, 2015 | 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    Phenotypic and Biomarker-Based Drug Discovery

    Speakers: Andras Bauer (Boehringer Ingelheim), Alex Huang (Genentech), Michael Jackson (Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute), Bryan Laffitte (Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation), Jonathan Lee (Eli Lilly), Lorenz Mayr (AstraZeneca), Friedrich Metzger (Hoffmann-La Roche), Aravind Subramanian (Broad Institute), Giulio Superti-Furga (Austrian Academy of Sciences), John Tallarico (Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research), Robert Temple (US Food and Drug Administration)

    This symposium aims to deepen our understanding of phenotypic drug discovery and to foster the exchange of ideas between industry-based and academic research scientists.

  • Past Events

    Tuesday, July 28, 2015 | 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM

    Leveraging Big Data and Predictive Knowledge to Fight Disease

    Speakers: Marc D Chioda (Pfizer Inc), Leonard James (Pfizer Inc), Iya Khalil (GNS Healthcare), Michael Matheny (Vanderbilt University), Jason H. Moore (University of Pennsylvania), Nicholas Tatonetti (Columbia University Medical Center), Craig P. Webb (NuMedii, Inc), Chunhua Weng (Columbia University), Diane Wuest (GNS Healthcare)

    In the era of precision medicine, analyses of large volumes of data are key to developing targeted and effective therapeutics. This symposium explores how big data and predictive knowledge are used to guide drug development and clinical trials.

    Friday, June 19, 2015 | 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM

    Microbes in the City:
    Mapping the Urban Genome

    Speakers: Joel Ackelsberg (NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene), Eric Alm (Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Martin J. Blaser (New York University Langone Medical Center), Ilana Brito (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Jane Carlton (New York University Center for Genomics and Systems Biology), Rumi Chunara (New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering), Laurie Garrett (Council on Foreign Relations), Jack Gilbert (Argonne National Laboratory), Jo Handelsman (White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), Curtis Huttenhower (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), W. Ian Lipkin (Center for Infection and Immunity, Columbia University), Juan Maestre (The University of Texas at Austin), Christopher Mason (Institute for Computational Biomedicine, Weill Cornell Medical College), Paula Olsiewski (Alfred P. Sloan Foundation), Rachel Poretsky (University of Illinois at Chicago), Coby Schal (North Carolina State University Department of Entomology)

    Efforts to map all of the genetic information of microbial communities that make up the urban genome—from kiosks and subways, to soil and sewage—seek to improve the health and productivity of the built environments in which we live.

    Thursday, June 18, 2015 | 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM

    Quantitative Biology:
    From Molecules to Man

    Keynote Speaker: Steve Kay (University of Southern California)
    Speakers: Francis J. Doyle III (University of California Santa Barbara), Andrew Ewald, PhD (Johns Hopkins University), Scott E. Fraser (University of Southern California), Peter Kuhn (University of Southern California), Christopher E. Mason (Weill Cornell Medical College), Paul Newton (University of Southern California), Amanda Randles (Harvard University), Chris Sander (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)

    Quantitative Biology: From Molecules to Man will bring together professionals in science, medicine, and engineering to articulate a vision for the future of improving patient health outcomes.

    Thursday, June 11, 2015 | 8:45 AM - 5:15 PM

    Learning from Cancer to Advance Neurodegeneration Drug Discovery and Development

    Keynote Speaker: Jane A. Driver (Brigham and Women's Hospital)
    Speakers: Kurt Brunden (University of Pennsylvania), Stuart Calderwood (Harvard Medical School), Gary Landreth (Case Western Reserve University), Tamara Maes, PhD (Oryzon Genomics S.A.), David M. Roy (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center), Stephen Strittmatter (Yale University School of Medicine), Li Huei Tsai (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Raymond Scott Turner (Georgetown University), Claes Wahlestedt (University of Miami Miller School of Medicine), Hui Zheng (Baylor College of Medicine)

    Does having cancer decrease your risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases? Why do many cancer drug targets overlap with targets for neurodegenerative diseases? This meeting will address these questions to help advance therapeutic development.

  • Publications 

    Annals

    Companion Diagnostics: From Biomarker Identification to Market Entry

    Edited by Claudio Carini (Pfizer)

    Discusses the development of biomarker-based companion diagnostics to optimize diagnosis and treatment choices.

    Annals

    Translational Neuroscience in Psychiatry: Light at the End of the Tunnel

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals volume discusses progress in neuroscience that translates to new treatments for psychiatric illness, with a focus on progress in developing quantitative endpoints to measure disease progression and response to therapy in depression and schizophrenia.

    Volume 1344

    Annals

    Dizziness and Balance Disorders

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals volume explores the anatomy, physiology, and pharmacotherapy of dizziness and balance disorders, including acrophobia, vertigo, downbeat nystagmus, and Ménière's disease.

    Volume 1343

    Annals

    Malaria: Advances in Pathophysiology, Biology, and Drug Development

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals volume presents recent research on the pathophysiology, biology, and treatment of malaria.

    Volume 1342

  • Podcasts

    A recent conference held at the Academy asked a downright outrageous question: Can dementia be prevented by making changes to your diet? In this podcast we look at what the answers might be.

    Download (87 MB, 38:11)

    In the second of a two-part series, experts look at the links between health and nutrition. They examine everything from how nutrition impacts hospital stays, to cancer and aging, to developing food science innovations, and improving diet.

    Download (45 MB, 19:56)

    In this first of a two-part series, experts from various sectors explore the available options to reduce "hidden hunger"—micronutrient deficiencies in a population.

    Download (71 MB, 31:13)
  • Webinar Archives

    Webinar Archive
    February 23, 2010

    Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Translation from Discovery to Clinical Trials

    Researchers met to discuss advances in basic and translational research on metabotropic glutamate receptors, which are promising targets in drug discovery for CNS diseases and other illnesses.

    Webinar Archive
    October 27, 2009

    Is Alzheimer's Disease Type 3 Diabetes?

    What is the connection between dysregulated neuronal insulin signaling and Alzheimer's disease? In a recent Academy webinar, some researchers argued that the neurodegenerative disease should be considered a type of diabetes.

    Webinar Archive
    April 28, 2009

    Protein Kinases: Structure-Guided Drug Discovery

    Protein kinases play a key role in almost every major pathway in eukaryotic cells. Structural approaches, including a new method called fragment-based drug design, are identifying potential targets against diseases including cancer.