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  • The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science
  • A Thought for Food Podcast Series

    A Thought for Food, Series 1 and 2, are entertaining podcasts produced by The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science. The goal of A Thought for Food is for listeners to learn about food nutrients. Host David Hoffman welcomes guests from more than 15 universities and academic institutions, private sector food companies, and farmers to discover how nutrients and food affect the human body.

    Series 1   |   Series 2

  • A Thought for Food: Series 1

    How do we know what's really good for us in an age of information overload? The first installment in our new podcast series on nutrition follows the journey of food from the table through the digestive tract to begin to get to the bottom of that big question.

    Download (30 MB, 22:57)
    Podcast
    February 27, 2012

    A Thought for Food: Tiny Amounts

    Scurvy was once the scourge of the seven seas, but it turned out to have a simple solution: Vitamin C. In the second installment of our nutrition series, learn all about the power of vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients.

    Download (32 MB, 24:43)

    Though fat and sugar are often seen as the bad guys in the world of nutrients, the truth is our body needs them to survive. Begin to explore those most maligned compounds in the third edition of our nutrition series.

    Download (28 MB, 26:18)

    Trans fat, saturated fat, hydrogenated oil—such terms are plastered on food labels across the country. But what do any of them really mean? Find out all about fat in this episode of our nutrition series.

    Download (32 MB, 30:08)

    The battle of wills to resist the last cupcake isn't the only one being waged over sugar. In fact, sugar—or fructose to be more precise—is one of the most hotly contested subjects in the world of nutrition. Find out why in the fifth edition of our nutrition series.

    Download (42 MB, 38:36)
    Podcast
    July 23, 2012

    A Thought for Food: Rock Steady

    Salt is one of the most important and versatile ingredients in foods around the world. We like it, we need it, but are we getting too much of it these days? Get the big picture on this unique compound in episode six of our nutrition series.

    Download (32 MB, 29:50)

    Nutrition is notoriously tricky to get a handle on, with conflicting reports and unsubstantiated fads all over the place. So why can't science get to the bottom of what's right—and right for you? For one, it has a lot to do with things called biomarkers.

    Download (19 MB, 22:29)
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  • A Thought for Food: Series 2

    Podcast
    June 7, 2013

    A Thought for Food: Meet the Meat

    How did the hamburger become a staple American food? A Thought for Food considers the science and history of the key ingredient, beef.

    Download (33 MB, 29:36)
    Podcast
    June 14, 2013

    A Thought for Food: Going to Seed

    The second installment of A Thought for Food’s systematic analysis of America's sandwich, the cheeseburger, looks at bread—one of the strangest and most interesting products humanity has ever invented.

    Download (41 MB, 36:35)

    For the third installment of our dissection of the humble cheeseburger, A Thought for Food considers a Paleolithic super food that’s still popular worldwide—cheese.

    Download (26 MB, 22:44)
    Podcast
    June 28, 2013

    A Thought for Food: Veg Everlasting

    The fourth installment of our systematic breakdown of a cheeseburger deals with ketchup and pickles, two attempts to give vegetables the power to defy time.

    Download (32 MB, 28:31)

    In this installment of A Thought for Food’s consideration of the cheeseburger, we analyze the king of side dishes, the French fry.

    Download (25 MB, 22:08)
    Podcast
    July 12, 2013

    A Thought for Food: Eating Animals

    The final installment of our step-by-step analysis of the cheeseburger culminates in a question that’s both very simple and tremendously complex—should we eat meat?

    Download (34 MB, 30:02)
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