Comments*

 
  • Science Alliance
  • Featured Events

    August 1 – August 5, 2016

    2016 Science Alliance Leadership Training Institute (SALT)

    Science Alliance Leadership Training (SALT) will be an intensive 5 day institute to prepare STEM PhD students to assume leadership roles through their professional careers.


    Monday, December 14, 2015

    Journey Through Science Day 2015

    Fifty exceptional students and early career scientists (MS, PhD, postdoc) will be selected for this unique opportunity to interact with PepsiCo's R&D leadership, learn about their efforts to develop products rooted in science-based nutrition, and get an exclusive glimpse of how science has shaped their careers.

  • Events 

    Monday, May 9, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Complexity: A Science of the Future?

    Featuring: Bernard Chazelle (The Discrepancy Method: Randomness and Complexity), Marcelo Gleiser (A Tear at the Edge of Creation), and Geoffrey West (Santa Fe Institute).
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    The advent of sophisticated computer technology has allowed studies of complex systems such as cell colonies, neurons in the brain, the immune system, economic markets, and social groups. In complex systems, simple, nonlinear interactions are iterated over time and give rise to self-organization, evolution, learning, and adaptation—phenomena that eluded explanation until now. This panel, including selected physicists, will explore whether studies of complexity complement traditional physics or may upend science as we know it.

    May 10 - 12, 2016 | United Kingdom

    Food-Microbiome Interaction: Implications for Health & Disease

    Keynote Speakers: John Bienenstock (McMaster University) and Jeffrey Gordon (Washington University in St. Louis – via Skype)

    The human body is colonized by a vast number of commensal organisms, collectively termed the microbiome. Importantly, dysbiosis — dyregulation of this endemic microbiome — has been implicated in a myriad of human diseases ranging from inflammatory bowel disease, to depression.

    Wednesday, May 11, 2016 | 2:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Graduate Student and Postdoc Career Symposium at the NewYorkBio Conference

    Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) graduate students and postdocs have many career options, but it can be difficult to find resources and information on the job exploration process.

    Saturday, May 14, 2016 | 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    MGSN Career Fair 2016

    Keynote Speaker: Gilda A. Barabino (The Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York)

    Join the Minority Graduate Student Network (MGSN) and the Science Alliance for the MGSN Career Fair 2016, an event connecting top graduate students and postdoctoral associates in STEM with ready-to-hire employers.

    Monday, May 16, 2016 | 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    Exposing Vulnerabilities in Cancer Metabolism: New Discoveries

    Speakers: Kivanc Birsoy (The Rockefeller University), Steven S. Gross (Weill Cornell Medical College), Marcia Haigis (Harvard Medical School), Kayvan R. Keshari (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center), Brendan D. Manning (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), Joshua Rabinowitz (Princeton University), David M. Sabatini (Whitehead Institute), Reuben Shaw (Salk Institute for Biological Studies), and Eileen White (Rutgers University)

    This symposium will highlight insights into tumor metabolism from leaders in the field and explore how this information is being used to design safe and effective, metabolism-targeted therapies.

    May 18 - 20, 2016

    The Addicted Brain and New Treatment Frontiers: Sixth Annual Aspen Brain Forum

    Keynote Speakers: Nora D. Volkow (National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. National Institutes of Health), George F. Koob (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. National Institutes of Health), and The Honorable Patrick J. Kennedy (Former United States Representative, Rhode Island; Co-Founder, One Mind; and Founder, Kennedy Forum)

    Discover from leading experts, including NIAAA and NIDA directors, the latest on neurobiology of addiction; susceptibility of the teen brain; new treatment strategies; and social, economic, political, and legislative aspects of this disease.

    Wednesday, May 18, 2016 | 5:45 PM - 7:00 PM

    Arrested Development: The Teenage Brain and Substance Abuse

    Moderator: Claudia Wallis (Scientific American Mind)
    Panelists: Jeremy Waletzky (The George Washington University), Nora D. Volkow (NIH), and Honorable Gregory P. Canova, JD; additional panelist to be announced

    1.3 million adolescents in the US have substance use disorder and marijuana use among teens now exceeds cigarette smoking. Join us for a public panel discussion on how neuroscience intersects with policy to improve lives of teens with addiction.

    Monday, May 23, 2016 | 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    The Rise of Human Consciousness

    Featuring: David Chalmers (Center for Mind, Brain and Consciousness, New York University), Michael Graziano (Princeton University), Hod Lipson (Columbia University) and Max Tegmark (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).
    Moderator: George Musser (Spooky Action at a Distance)

    Advances in physical and information sciences, biology, and neuroscience have dramatically enhanced our knowledge of the human species. But can physical sciences solve the biggest mystery—the emergence of human consciousness? Join our panel to explore this question and its implications.

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016 | 11:30 AM - 5:00 PM

    Chemical Biology Discussion Group Year-End Symposium

    Speakers: Philip A. Cole (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), Kenneth W. Duncan (Epizyme, Inc.)

    The Chemical Biology Discussion Group brings together chemists and biologists interested in discussing the latest breakthroughs. In 2016, the annual year-end meeting features keynote speakers Dr Philip Cole and Dr Kenneth Duncan.

    Thursday, May 26, 2016 | 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

    HIV 2016: HIV and Non-Communicable Diseases — Opportunities and Challenges

    Featured Speaker: Luiz Loures (UNAIDS)

    This event will address the incidence of non-communicable diseases among people living with HIV, describe morbidity and mortality, and explore interactions among HIV, antiretroviral drugs and behavioral factors influencing development and treatment.

  • Past Events

    Monday, May 2, 2016 | 11:30 AM - 3:00 PM

    Lyceum Society May 2016 Meeting

    The Lyceum Society comprises the Academy's retired and semi-retired members. Talks cover various scientific fields. All Academy members are welcome.

    Thursday, April 28, 2016 | 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

    Bioenergetics and Brain Health Basics: Diet, Exercise, and Taking Out the Trash

    Speakers: Gary E. Gibson (Burke Rehabilitation Center), Kirk I. Erickson (University of Pittsburgh), and Mony J. de Leon (NYU Langone Medical Center)

    Psychology Section joint meeting with the New York Neuropsychology Group.

    Thursday, April 28, 2016 | 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    Epigenetics: Cancer and Beyond

    Keynote Speaker: Craig B. Thompson (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)
    Speakers: Michael Elowitz (California Institute of Technology), Eric Campeau (Zenith Epigenetics), Ewelina Kulikowski (Resverlogix Corp), Keiko Ozato (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development), Roberto Pili (Indiana University School of Medicine), Patrick Trojer (Constellation), Christopher Vakoc (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory), Daniel Vitt (4SC AG)

    Epigenetic abnormalities are a recognized contributing factor in tumorigenesis and other diseases. This symposium describes recent progress in validating the therapeutic potential of small molecule inhibitors targeting epigenetics marks.

    Wednesday, April 27, 2016 | 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    Science and Art in China: Li Matou (Matteo Ricci), Lang Shining (Giuseppe Castiglione), and the Influence of Western Geometry and Mathematical Perspective on Early Qing Dynasty Mathematicians and Artists

    Featuring: Joseph Dauben (The City University of New York)

    Presented by the History & Philosophy of Science Section of The New York Academy of Sciences.

    Tuesday, April 26, 2016 | 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    Solute Carrier Proteins: Unlocking the Gene-Family for Effective Therapies

    Speakers: Dax Fu (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine), Kathleen M. Giacomini (University of California, San Francisco), Matthias A. Hediger (University of Bern), Avner Schlessinger (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai), Giulio Superti-Furga (Austrian Academy of Sciences), Ming Zhou (Baylor College of Medicine), and Kim Huard (Pfizer Inc.)

    Solute Carrier Proteins are an untapped resource for drug discovery. This event will discuss breakthroughs in structural biology, cell engineering and metabolomics that hold the promise of "unlocking" this gene family.

  • Career Path Videos

    Many scientists struggle with how to share their work with a wider audience, but Cesar Berríos-Otero found that his passion for science was equal to his love of outreach.


    How does a bright young scientist become an entrepreneur and venture capital investor? Learn how Jorge M. Torres used his scientific background to help launch a career as a venture capital investor.


    Interested in working as a Medical Science Liaison (MSL)? Dr. Arati Sadalge Kreibich discusses her work as an MSL and provides advice on how you can transition from the bench and into MSL positions.


    Interested in starting your own company? Listen to Dr. Joshua Spodek discusses his exciting path from a PhD in physics to a career as entrepreneur.


    Interested in working in science and international policy? Dr. Dana Perkins discusses her extensive career in government and provides advice on how you can transition from the bench and into the exciting world of policy.


    Interested in promoting the next generation of researchers through innovative education initiatives? Dr. Oscar Pineda-Catalan, Manager of the American Museum of Natural History's Science Research Mentoring Program, discusses the importance of engaging youth in science education and how to develop skills to be an effective educator and mentor that can help young professionals to develop alternative careers in science.


    Are you interested in informal science programs? Do you want to help create a larger science community? Dr. Jeanne Garbarino, Director of Science Outreach at The Rockefeller University, explains how her interest in science communication—via blogging, social media and research programs—has helped her reach new audiences.


    Dream of independence and your own company? Human Workflows and SciPhD co-founder Randy Ribaudo discusses the rewards and challenges of entrepreneurship, and how scientists can apply their problem-solving skills—and improve their communication skills—to successfully start and run a business.


    Interested in the business of science or how research programs get designed, funded, and managed? Hear Mike Holland discuss how he went from imaging aluminum uptake in soybean roots to overseeing multi-billion dollar federal research programs.


    Interested in translating your science critical thinking skills to the market? Listen to Caroline Corner describe how she left the lab bench to break into the finance industry as an equity research analyst and consultant.


    Want to learn more about consulting? Hear Jeremy Buzzard, a PhD in molecular and cellular biology, talk about his career in management consulting as a partner at McKinsey & Co.


    Intrigued by the forensic scientists on shows like CSI? Find out what the job's really like from criminalist Craig O'Connor, who joined the Office of Chief Medical Examiner in NYC after earning a PhD in genetics.


    If you're thinking about a career in academia, find out how Rachel O'Neill transitioned from her postdoc to a faculty position, as well as the benefits and challenges of this path.


    Hear Laura Malisheski discuss how she transitioned from her postdoc in neuroscience to advising others on their career paths.


    If working with scientists to patent their inventions sounds appealing, hear Ryan Murphey talk about how you can get into intellectual property law with a PhD.


    For those with a passion for communicating science: Beth Schachter details her journey as an assistant professor who left the bench to pursue a career in science communications.


    If teaching is your calling, tune in to Ellen Cohn, an immunologist, talk about her transition into teaching middle school science.


    Want to be a journal editor? Listen to Brooke Grindlinger discuss her path from being a PhD in microbiology to an editor at the Journal of Clinical Investigation.


    Interested in publishing? Hear Jennifer Henry discuss how she went from studying plant molecular biology to being a publishing manager at Nature.

  • Publications 

    eBriefing

    Regenerative Medicine: Transitioning Therapeutics from Cells to the Clinic

    Organizers: Jane S. Lebkowski (Asterias Biotherapeutics), George Zavoico (JonesTrading Institutional Services), Sonya Dougal (The New York Academy of Sciences), and Caitlin McOmish (The New York Academy of Sciences)

    This eBriefing considers efforts to rethink clinical, regulatory, and manufacturing approaches to accelerate the transition of cell-based therapies to the clinic.

    eBriefing

    Developing Scientists through Outreach

    Keynote Speakers: Emily Rice (College of Staten Island, CUNY), Mark Stewart (SUNY Downstate Medical Center), and Robert Tai (University of Virginia)

    This eBriefing reviews STEM mentoring programs and other outreach strategies for scientists.

    eBriefing

    Microbes in the City: Mapping the Urban Genome

    Keynote Speakers: Jo Handelsman (White House Office of Science and Technology Policy), W. Ian Lipkin (Columbia University), Curtis Huttenhower (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), and Coby Schal (North Carolina State University)

    This eBriefing reviews work to map the urban metagenome to probe the microbial communities in the buildings and subways, soil and sewers in our cities.

    eBriefing

    Clinical and Nutrition Interventions to Manage Disease-related Loss of Lean Body Mass

    Organizers: David Evans (Ohio State University), Refaat Hegazi (Abbott Nutrition Health Institute), Gerard Mullin (Johns Hopkins Medicine), Dennis H. Sullivan (University of Arkansas for the Medical Sciences), Kathy West (Abbott Nutrition Health Institute), Amy R. Beaudreault (The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science), and Julie Shlisky (The Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science)

    This eBriefing reviews interventions for disease-related muscle mass loss.

    Annals

    Special Issue: Nutrition in Prevention and Management of Dementia

    Edited by Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences editorial staff

    This Annals issue discusses emerging nutrition research on the prevention and management of dementia in aging populations.

    Volume 1367

  • Webinar Archives

    Webinar Archive
    March 2, 2010

    Emerging Infectious Diseases in Response to Climate Change

    Climate and weather are important components of complex ecosystems, and with these changes, the dynamic balance between the living components of ecosystems is often disturbed. Experts in climate change, climate policy, emerging infectious diseases and public health discussed the relevant and pressing issues that we as a global community face as the planet's climate is altered.

    Webinar Archive
    February 23, 2010

    Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Translation from Discovery to Clinical Trials

    Researchers met to discuss advances in basic and translational research on metabotropic glutamate receptors, which are promising targets in drug discovery for CNS diseases and other illnesses.

    Webinar Archive
    January 5, 2010

    Envisioning a Low-Carbon Clean Energy Economy in New York

    New York Governor David Paterson has set a target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the state by 80% by the year 2050. Stakeholders met at the Academy to discuss strategies for reaching this goal.