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Annals

Innate Inflammation and Stroke

Edited by Edited by Gregory J. del Zoppo (University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington), Philip B. Gorelick (University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois), and Wolfgang Eisert (University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany)
Innate Inflammation and Stroke

Published: October 2010

Volume 1207

This Annals issue brings together scientists and clinicians with research experience who have studied innate inflammation in the central nervous system and relationships to cerebrovascular risk.
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This Annals issue brings together scientists and clinicians with research experience who have studied innate inflammation in the central nervous system. The focus will be on molecular and cellular mechanisms that are altered by innate inflammation and the translation to cerebrovascular risk. Additional focus will be on evaluation of animal studies reflecting the pathophysiological consequences following acute or chronic ischemia—-with the reference to time course and level of innate inflammation—-and formation of reactive oxygen species.