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eBriefing

Advances in Translational Models to Study Fibrosis

Advances in Translational Models to Study Fibrosis
Reported by
Megan Stephan

Posted July 31, 2018

Presented By

The Biochemical Pharmacology Discussion Group

The New York Academy of Sciences

Overview

Wound healing has long held fascination for basic and medical researchers. Scar formation, by a process known as fibrosis, allows tissues and organs to recover from injuries, although not always perfectly. Fibrosis also allows organs, such as the heart and lungs, to remodel themselves to meet changing physiologic demands. While these types of fibrosis are beneficial, misplaced or excessive fibrosis can be quite detrimental to tissue and organ function, and lies at the core of many human disease states. On April 17, 2018, fibrosis researchers convened at The New York Academy of Sciences to discuss methods to study, prevent, and ultimately treat disease conditions caused by pathologic fibrosis, in a one-day conference entitled Advances in Translational Models to Study Fibrosis.

Speakers

Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts University
Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts University
Florian Rieder, MD, Lerner Research Institute and Cleveland Clinic
Florian Rieder, MD, Lerner Research Institute and Cleveland Clinic
Robert Lafyatis, MD, University of Pittsburgh
Robert Lafyatis, MD, University of Pittsburgh
Galina Bogatkevich, MD, PhD, Medical University of South Carolina
Galina Bogatkevich, MD, PhD, Medical University of South Carolina
Eric White, MD, University of Michigan School of Medicine
Eric White, MD, University of Michigan School of Medicine
Scott MacDonnell, PhD, Regeneron
Scott MacDonnell, PhD, Regeneron
Katalin Susztak, MD, PhD, Perelmann School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
Katalin Susztak, MD, PhD, Perelmann School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
Joseph Bonventre, MD, PhD, Harvard Medical School
Joseph Bonventre, MD, PhD, Harvard Medical School
Mary E. Choi, MD, Weill Cornell Medicine
Mary E. Choi, MD, Weill Cornell Medicine
Introduction
Session 1: Emerging Strategies for Fibrosis
Session 2: Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Fibrosis
Session 4: Novel Models of Fibrotic Kidney Disease
Open Questions