eBriefing

Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Oncology and Beyond

Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Reported by
Pia-Kelsey O’ Neill

Posted March 02, 2018

Pia-Kelsey O'Neill holds a PhD in Neuroscience from Columbia University, where she is currently completing a postdoctoral fellowship.

Presented By

Biochemical Pharmacology Discussion Group

The New York Academy of Sciences

Overview

Over a century ago, immunologist and founder of chemotherapy Paul Ehrlich proposed that antibodies could be what he called the “magic bullets” of cancer treatment. A key component of the immune system, antibodies identify and bind to foreign targets known as antigens. This fundamental property has informed the development of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs), an evolving class of anticancer therapeutics that uses the selective targeting of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in combination with cancer-killing cytotoxic drugs. ADC research has evolved into an active, multidisciplinary field that now extends beyond uses in oncology. On November 14, 2017 the Biochemical Pharmacology Discussion Group at the New York Academy of Sciences presented Antibody–Drug Conjugates: Oncology and Beyond, a symposium on the benefits and challenges of ADCs for cancer treatment and the next wave of advancements in the field, including the use of ADCs as treatment for other disease indications.

Speakers

Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Laura Saunders, PhD, AbbVie Stemcentrx LLC
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Jessica R. Kirshner, PhD, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Ryan Fleming, MSc, MedImmune
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Christopher J. O'Donnell, PhD, Pfizer
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Rakesh K. Jain, PhD, Harvard University
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Greg Thurber, PhD, University of Michigan
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Timothy Lowinger, PhD, Mersana Therapeutics
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Philip E. Brandish, PhD, Merck & Co.
Antibody-Drug Conjugates
Robert Stoffel, AbbVie
Session I: Antibody-Drug Conjugates for Oncology
Session II: Tumor Microenvironment
Session III: Other Indications for Antibody-Drug Conjugates