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eBriefing

Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease

Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Reported by
Kristifor Sunderic

Posted May 15, 2018

Presented By

The Biochemical Pharmacology Discussion Group

The New York Academy of Sciences

Overview

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a metabolic liver disorder characterized by fat deposition, inflammation, and insulin resistance, is the second leading cause of disease driving the need for liver transplantation in the United States. Currently, there are no approved treatments available. Scientists and clinicians have developed a better understanding of this disease state using animal models, targeted drugs, and risk alleles, but the development of human-translatable in vitro models of disease for drug metabolism and injury is still nascent, though data is growing. On February 20, 2018, the Biochemical Pharmacology Discussion Group at the New York Academy of Sciences presented Translational Approaches for Human Liver Diseases, a symposium on current and emerging in vitro model systems, covering potential benefits and limitations for the treatment of liver disease.

Speakers

Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Scott Friedman, MD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Shyam Sundhar Bale, PhD, Draper Laboratory
Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Paulina Ordonez, MD, University of California, San Diego
Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Robert Schwartz, MD, PhD, Weill Cornell Medical College
Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Michael Shuler, PhD, Cornell University
Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Leah Norona, PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Translational Approaches for Human Liver Disease
Ernesto Guccione, PhD, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
In Vitro Models of Liver Injury
NASH and Tissue Models