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eBriefing

Resolving Neuro-Inflammation to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease and Pain

Resolving Neuro-Inflammation to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease and Pain
Reported by
Sara Donnelly

Posted April 13, 2020

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

Overview

Inflammation in the nervous system plays a key role in many acute health problems including Alzheimer’s disease and chronic pain — both of which affect millions of people globally and lack effective treatments. This eBriefing will explore how the body’s failure to resolve chronic neuro-inflammation contributes to disease, as well as highlight opportunities to develop pro-resolving compounds as novel therapies.

In This Webinar, You’ll Learn:

  • The role of neuro-inflammation as a key component of severe global health problems including Alzheimer’s disease and chronic pain conditions.
  • How new research suggests that the failure to resolve neuro-inflammation may be a major contributor to the pathology of these diseases.
  • The latest advances in targeting resolution pathways to develop effective drugs for neurological diseases of high unmet need.

Speakers

Marianne Schultzberg, PhD
Marianne Schultzberg, PhD

Karolinska Institutet

Ru-Rong Ji, PhD
Ru-Rong Ji, PhD

Duke University School of Medicine

Resolving Neuro-Inflammation to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease and Pain

Speakers

Resolving Neuro-Inflammation to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease and Pain


Marianne Schultzberg (Karolinska Institutet) Ru-Rong Ji (Duke University School of Medicine)
  • 04:38
    Marianne Schultzberg, PhD
  • 28:13
    Ru-Rong Ji, PhD

Marianne Schultzberg, PhD
Karolinska Institutet

Marianne Schultzberg has been Professor of Clinical Neuroscience at the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society at the Karolinska Institutet since 2005. Her research focuses on the role of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and in recent years has focused on the potential roles of pro-resolving mediators in AD pathogenesis. She received her PhD in 1980, carried out post-doctoral research at Liverpool University and became Docent (Associate Professor) at the Karolinska Institutet in 1983.

Ru-Rong Ji, PhD
Duke University School of Medicine

Ru-Rong Ji is the chief of pain research within Duke Anesthesiology, co-director of the Center for Translational Pain Medicine, and a professor of anesthesiology and neurobiology. He research focuses on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of chronic pain, such as inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and cancer pain. He earned a PhD in neurobiology at Shanghai Institute of Physiology and completed postdoctoral training at Peking (Beijing) University Medical School, Karolinska Institute, and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was associate professor at Harvard Medical School, before joining the Duke faculty in 2012.

Further Readings

Schultzberg

Wang X, Zhu M, Hjorth E, et al.

Alzheimers Dement. 2015;11(1):40–50.

Zhu M, Wang X, Hjorth E, et al.

Mol Neurobiol. 2016;53(4):2733–2749

Emre C, Hjorth E, Bharani K, et al

[published online ahead of print, 2020 Jan 7]. Brain Pathol

Hamlett ED, Hjorth E, Ledreux A, et al.

[published online ahead of print, 2020 Jan 16]. Glia

Ji

Ji RR, Nackley A, Huh Y, Terrando N, Maixner W.

Anesthesiology. 2018;129(2):343–366

Xu ZZ, Zhang L, Liu T, et al.

Nat Med. 2010;16(5):592–597

Xu ZZ, Liu XJ, Berta T, et al.

Ann Neurol. 2013;74(3):490–495

Bang S, Xie YK, Zhang ZJ, et al.

J Clin Invest. 2018;128(8):3568–3582

Qu L, Caterina MJ.

J Clin Invest. 2018;128(8):3246–3249.