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eBriefing

Will COVID-19 Eliminate the SAT?

Will COVID-19 Eliminate the SAT?
Reported by
Danielle Mink-Bellizzi

Posted December 07, 2020

Presented By

Science Alliance

The growing wave of colleges and universities adopting “test-optional” or “test-flexible” policies may be a turning point in the discussion of the value of using standardized test scores in admissions decisions. This shift has accelerated conversations about the future of standardized testing, and is forcing admissions offices to consider how they might evaluate talent and predict students' success on campus without it. The New York Academy of Sciences hosted a panel discussion with higher education leaders and researchers on the implications of “test-optional,” “test-flexible,” and “test-blind” policies on the college admissions process, as well as how these changes could reduce the many inequalities that plague the current system.

In this eBriefing, You'll Learn:

  • What policymakers will do about testing once the pandemic is over
  • How changing standardized test requirements can help close diversity gaps on college campuses and make the admissions process more equitable
  • What information admissions officers might use in place of standardized test scores to help them make decisions
  • How character can be counted in the college admission process
  • How High School counseling can shape a student's postsecondary attendance
  • Major takeaways from institutions that have done away with standardized testing requirements

Speakers

Eric Hoover
Eric Hoover

The Chronicle of Higher Education

Akil Bello
Akil Bello

Fairtest

Lyndsay Conger
Lindsey Conger

MoonPrep

Jerome Lucido
Jerome Lucido, PhD

USC Rossier

Will COVID-19 Kill the SAT?

Speakers

Will COVID-19 Kill the SAT?


Hoover/Bello/Conger/Lucido (The Chronicle of Higher Education/Fairtest/MoonPrep/USC Rossier)

Eric Hoover
The Chronicle of Higher Education

Eric Hoover is the Senior Writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education covering, college admissions, enrollment, and access. He attended The University of Virginia, wrote for the student newspaper, and became the top editor during his third year. Two jobs later, at the age of 26, he applied for a position at The Chronicle of Higher Education, where he Editor three years later. Eric has won the 2018 Eugene S. Pulliam National Journalism Writing Award for his 2017 story “The Arc of Her Survival.” The story introduces Kristina Anderson, who was seriously wounded in the 2007 Virginia Tech University mass shooting and is today a leader in the national “survivor community.” Hoover has written extensively about college admissions, early decision in college admissions, affirmative action, standardized testing, college counseling, and the challenges facing low-income students. He has also contributed freelance articles to the New York Times, the Washington PostWashington Monthly, and Nautilus. The Education Writers Association, the Virginia Press Association, and the Mensa Education and Research Foundation have recognized his work.

 

Akil Bello
Fairtest 

Akil Bello started as a proctor for the Princeton Review in 1990 and returned to serve as the Director of Strategic Initiatives in 2014. In 2018, Akil became the Director of Equity and Access, where his focus is on helping public schools, non-profit organizations, and community-based organizations understand standardized tests and develop affordable solutions for their students. He was founding partner and CEO of Bell Curves, a test-prep company dedicated to the underserved and disadvantaged communities. Akil currently works as Senior Director of Advocacy and Advancement at the National Center for Fair & Open Testing.

Akil attended an HBCU, ultimately earning a bachelor’s degree in architecture at Pratt Institute. He continues to develop workshops on test preparation and achieving educational success with limited resources. He has spoken at the PhD Project Annual Conference, the Harlem Business Alliance 2013 Summit, Yale School of Management Explore Diversity Weekend, Graduate Management Admissions Council Annual Conference, KIPP Schools Summit, and National Partnership for Education Alliance Annual Conference.

 

Lindsey Conger
MoonPrep College

Lindsey Conger is a College Counselor and Tutor working closely with students entering BS/MD direct medical as well as BS/MD direct dental programs. Lindsey works to strengthen student’s college applications by helping them find summer research opportunities and apply to summer camps and select courses; she also guides students into leadership positions. As a journalist, she coaches students on the narrative form of writing to pivot the conversation of what factors might be counted in the college admission process. Lindsey holds a Bachelor’s degree in Journalism from Indiana University Bloomington.

 

Jerome A. Lucido, PhD
USC Rossier 

Jerome A. Lucido is a Professor of Research at the USC Rossier School of Education. He opened the USC Center for Enrollment Research, Policy and Practice in 2010 and currently serves as Executive Director. In this role, he develops initiatives to improve access for low-income and underrepresented students. With over 30 years of enrollment experience as the Assistant Vice President for enrollment services and academic support at the University of Arizona, Dr. Lucido also served as a trustee of the College Board, chair of the College Board’s Task Force on College Admission in the 21st Century, and as vice-chair of the Commission on Access, Admission, and Success in Higher Education. Prior to his work at USC, he oversaw the Offices of Undergraduate Admission, Scholarship and Student Aid, and the University Registrar at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

Dr. Lucido’s career in higher education began at Kent State University, where he served as Associate Director of Admissions before becoming the Director of Admissions at the University of Arizona. Dr. Lucido holds a PhD in higher education from the University of Arizona, an MEd from Kent State University, and a BS  in business administration from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Further Readings

Misc.

Hoover, Eric

The Chronicle of Higher Education. 2020 Nov 9.

Jaworowski, Ken

The New York Times, The New York Times. 2018 Apr 26.

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College Board

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