Cracking the Neural Code: Third Annual Aspen Brain Forum

Cracking the Neural Code: Third Annual Aspen Brain Forum

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - Saturday, August 25, 2012

Aspen Meadows Resort, Aspen, CO

Presented By

Presented by The New York Academy of Sciences and The Aspen Brain Forum Foundation

 

One of the greatest challenges in neuroscience today is deciphering how the activity of individual neurons and neuronal circuits gives rise to higher order cognition and behavior. This meeting will bring together leading researchers working at the forefront of systems and computational neuroscience to discuss cutting-edge developments in our quest to crack the neural code. Plenary talks will include advances in tools, technologies, imaging, informatics, and computational models for mapping neural networks.

Keynote speakers will feature Drs. Christof Koch and Allan Jones (The Allen Institute for Brain Science), David Van Essen (Washington University in St. Louis), Sean Hill (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne), and George Church (Harvard Medical School).

Registration Pricing

 By 7/13/2012After 7/13/2012Onsite
Member$295$350$395
Student/Postdoc Member$195$250$295
Nonmember (Academia)$395$450$495
Nonmember (Corporate)$495$595$650
Nonmember (Non-profit)$395$450$495
Nonmember (Student / Postdoc / Fellow)$195$250$295

 

Presented by

  • Aspen Brain Forum
  • New York Academy of Sciences

Agenda

* Presentation times are subject to change.


Day One — Thursday, August 23, 2012

5:00 PM

Registration

5:30 PM

Welcome Remarks

5:45 PM

Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist
Christof Koch, PhD, Allen Institute for Brain Science

6:30 PM

Networking Reception

7:30 PM

Adjourn

Day Two — Friday, August 24, 2012

8:00 AM

Registration and Continental Breakfast

Session 1: Keynote Lectures

9:00 AM

Neural Coding: Building Brain Observatories at the Allen Institute
Christof Koch, PhD, Allen Institute for Brain Science

9:30 AM

Mapping Gene Expression and Connections in the CNS: Tools and Data from the Allen Institute for Brain Science
Allan Jones, PhD, Allen Institute for Brain Science

10:00 AM

The Human Macro-connectome
David Van Essen, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis

10:30 AM

Blue Brain: Insights From the Synthesis of a Cortical Column
Sean Hill, PhD, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne

11:00 AM

Coffee Break

11:30 AM

Reading and Writing All Basepairs in a Genome and All Impulses in a Brain
George Church, PhD, Harvard Medical School

12:00 PM

Panel Discussion
Innovation and Collaboration: Successful Models for Multi-scale Neuroscience Research
Moderator: Fred H. Gage, PhD, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Panelists:
George Church, PhD, Harvard Medical School
Sean Hill, PhD, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
Allan Jones, PhD, Allen Institute for Brain Science
Christof Koch, PhD, Allen Institute for Brain Science
David Van Essen, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis

 

12:30 PM

Lunch

Session 2: Advances in Tools, Technology, and Methodology: Innovative Toolbuilding, Neuroimaging, and Neuroinformatics

1:30 PM

New Tools for Analyzing and Engineering Brain Circuits
Ed Boyden, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:50 PM

Sequencing the Connectome
Anthony Zador, MD, PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

2:10 PM

Imaging Neuronal Activity in the Freely Moving Animal: From the Eye to the Cortex
Jason N. D. Kerr, PhD, Networking Imaging Group, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany

2:30 PM

New Approaches for Correlated LM and 3D EM Applied to MULTISCALE CHALLENGES: Bridging Gaps in Knowledge and Understanding
Mark H. Ellisman, PhD, The National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR), University of California, San Diego

2:50 PM

Developing an International Neuroinformatics Infrastructure
Sean Hill, PhD, Karolinska Institute

Session 3: Advances in Tools, Technology and Methodology: Computational Models

3:10 PM

Prediction in the Retina
Stephanie E. Palmer, PhD, University of Chicago

3:30 PM

Coffee Break

4:00 PM

Bayesian Inference with Efficient Neural Population Codes
Alan A. Stocker, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

4:20 PM

The Orchestral Brain: Coding with Correlated and Heterogeneous Neurons
Rava Azeredo da Silveira, PhD, Ecole Normal Superieure, Paris

4:40 PM

View from the Top: What Probabilistic Models of Perception Can Teach Us about Neural Computation
Wei Ji Ma, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine

5:00 PM

Computing Intelligence: Mind, Brain and Machine
Tomaso Poggio, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

5:20 PM

Meeting Adjourns

Day Three — Saturday, August 25th, 2012

8:30 AM

Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:00 AM

Neural Plasticity and Neuronal Diversity
Fred H. Gage, PhD, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Session 4: Micro-level Cellular Behavior

9:30 AM

Model Building: From Coding of Fundamentals to Validation of a High-performance Neural Prosthetic
Andrew Schwartz, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

9:50 AM

Predicting Every Single Spike — Beyond Generalized Linear Modeling
Matthias Bethge, PhD, Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, University of Tübingen

10:10 AM

A New Class of Neural Population Codes
Ila R. Fiete, PhD, University of Texas at Austin

Session 5: Meso-level Circuits

10:30 AM

Neural Circuits Controlling Innate Emotional Behaviors
David J. Anderson, PhD, California Institute of Technology

10:50 AM

Coffee Break

11:10 AM

Sparse High-order Interaction Networks Underlie Learnable Neural Population Codes
Elad Schneidman, PhD, Weizmann Institute of Science

11:30 AM

A Statistical Approach to Understanding Decision-related Signals in Parietal Cortex
Jonathan W. Pillow, PhD, University of Texas at Austin

11:50 AM

Lunch

Session 6: Macro-level Systems

1:10 PM

Learning Volitional Control of Neural Activity: Natural Repertoire or Arbitrary Patterns?
Richard A. Andersen, PhD, California Institute of Technology

1:30 PM

Imaging Regional Connections in the Living Human Brain
Tim Behrens, DPhil, Oxford University

1:50 PM

Neural Syntax: Oscillations Promote Cell Assembly Sequences
Gyorgy Buzsaki, MD, PhD, The Neuroscience Institute, New York University Langone Medical Center

2:10 PM

Representational Transformations in Memory Consolidation
Yadin Dudai, PhD, Weizmann Institute of Science

2:30 PM

Mapping the Retinal Connectome with EyeWire, an Online Community for "Citizen Neuroscience"
Sebastian Seung, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Session 7: Applied Neurotechnology

2:50 PM

Decoding Vision: A Retinal Prosthetic Strategy with the Capacity to Restore Normal Vision
Sheila Nirenberg, PhD, Weill Medical College of Cornell University

3:10 PM

Neuronal Ensembles: Harnessing their Power in BrainGate and Epilepsy Research
Leigh R. Hochberg, MD, PhD, Brown University

3:30 PM

Glucose Powered Neural Prosthetics
Rahul Sarpeshkar, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

3:50 PM

The Future of Neural Coding and Brain Modeling: Q&A with Speakers

Richard Andersen, PhD, California Institute of Technology
Andrew Schwartz, PhD, University of Pittsburgh
David Anderson, PhD, California Institute of Technology
Gyorgy Buzsaki, MD, PhD, The Neuroscience Institute, New York University Langone Medical Center
Mark Ellisman, PhD, The National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR), University of California, San Diego
Yadin Dudai, PhD, Weizmann Institute of Science
Tomaso Poggio, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

4:20 PM

Closing Remarks

4:30 PM

Conference Concludes

Speakers

Keynote Speakers

George Church, PhD

Harvard Medical School

Sean Hill, PhD

Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne

Allan Jones, PhD

Allen Institute for Brain Science

Christof Koch, PhD

Allen Institute for Brain Science

David Van Essen, PhD

Washington University in St. Louis

Speakers

Richard Andersen, PhD

California Institute of Technology

David J. Anderson, PhD

California Institute of Technology

Tim Behrens, DPhil

Oxford University

Matthias Bethge, PhD

University of Tübingen

Ed Boyden, PhD

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Gyorgy Buzsaki, MD, PhD

The Neuroscience Institute, New York University Langone Medical Center

Yadin Dudai, PhD

Weizmann Institute of Science

Mark H. Ellisman, PhD

The National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR), University of California, San Diego

Ila R. Fiete, PhD

University of Texas at Austin

Fred H. Gage, PhD

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Leigh R. Hochberg, MD, PhD

Brown University

Jason N. D. Kerr, PhD

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics

Wei Ji Ma, PhD

Baylor College of Medicine

Sheila Nirenberg, PhD

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Stephanie E. Palmer, PhD

University of Chicago

Jonathan W. Pillow, PhD

University of Texas at Austin

Tomaso Poggio, PhD

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Rahul Sarpeshkar, PhD

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Elad Schneidman, PhD

Weizmann Institute of Science

Andrew Schwartz, PhD

University of Pittsburgh

Sebastian Seung, PhD

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Rava Azeredo da Silveira, PhD

Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris

Alan A. Stocker, PhD

University of Pennsylvania

Anthony Zador, MD, PhD

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Abstracts

Day Two — Friday, August 24, 2012


Session 1: Keynote Lectures

Neural Coding: Building Brain Observatories at the Allen Institute
Christof Koch, PhD, Allen Institute for Brain Science

The Allen Institute for Brain Science is initiating a ten-year project to study the principles by which information is encoded, transformed and represented in the mammalian cerebral cortex and related structures. The Institute will build a series of brain observatories to identify, record and intervene in the neuronal networks underlying visually guided behaviors in the mouse, including visual perception, decision making and consciousness. This is a large-scale, in-house team effort to synthesize anatomical, physiological and theoretical knowledge into a description of the wiring scheme of the cortex, at both the structural and the functional levels. The fruits of this cerebroscope will be freely available to the public.

Mapping Gene Expression and Connections in the CNS: Tools and Data from the Allen Institute for Brain Science
Allan Jones, PhD, Allen Institute for Brain Science

The Allen Institute for Brain Science is a non-profit research organization dedicated to providing tools and data for the larger research community. Since 2003, the Allen Institute has created a suite of large-scale data efforts along with a web portal to view and analyze the data. These efforts include gene expression atlases of the developing and adult mouse brain and spinal cord, developing and adult human and non-human primate gene expression studies, and more recent efforts on connectivity atlases of the mouse brain. This presentation will cover an overview of the Allen Institute, its current projects and infrastructure, a few data highlights, and a look at future directions.

The Human Macro-connectome
David Van Essen, PhD, Washington University in St. Louis

Recent advances in noninvasive neuroimaging have set the stage for the systematic exploration of human brain circuits in health and disease. One such effort is the Human Connectome Project (HCP), which will characterize brain circuitry and its variability in healthy adults. A consortium of investigators at Washington University, University of Minnesota, University of Oxford, and 7 other institutions is engaged in a 5-year project to characterize the human connectome in 1,200 individuals (twins and their non-twin siblings). Information about structural and functional connectivity will be acquired using diffusion MRI and resting-state fMRI, respectively. Additional modalities will include task-evoked fMRI and MEG/EEG, plus extensive behavioral testing and genotyping. Advanced visualization and analysis methods will enable characterization of brain circuits in individuals and group averages at high spatial resolution and at the level of functionally distinct brain parcels (cortical areas and subcortical nuclei). Comparisons across subjects will reveal aspects of brain circuitry which are related to particular behavioral capacities and which are heritable or related to specific genetic variants.
 
Data from the HCP will be made freely available to the neuroscience community. A user-friendly informatics platform will enable investigators around the world to carry out many types of data mining on these freely accessible, information-rich datasets. Altogether, the HCP will provide invaluable information about the healthy human brain and its variability.

Blue Brain: Insights From the Synthesis of a Cortical Column
Sean Hill, PhD, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne

The Blue Brain Project aims to provide a generic facility for large-scale neuroscience data integration, modeling and simulation. A prototype facility has been completed, which is capable today of building neural microcircuits or modules of the rat brain with cellular level resolution. This prototype was founded on a novel data-driven and data-constrained process for creating, validating and researching the neocortical column. Recent models recreate key experimental findings of structural and functional properties of neocortical circuitry in vitro — including connectivity, synaptic responses and network dynamics. We present insights gained from this process including principles underlying invariance and robustness in cortical microcircuitry.

Reading and Writing All Basepairs in a Genome and All Impulses in a Brain
George Church, PhD, Harvard Medical School

We have brought down the cost of reading and writing DNA (in genomes and epigenomes) by about a million-fold in the past 8 years. Higher quality and comprehensiveness have greatly improved genomic models, software, and applications. Synthetic biology plus the decreasing size of components in wireless circuits will likely enable analogous exponential progress in brain-computer interfaces. The ability to inexpensively record, hyperpolarize, and depolarize precise combinations of neurons on demand is likely to be quite helpful for rapidly generating and testing models (see also PMID: 22726828).

Session 2: Advances in Tools, Technology, and Methodology: Innovative Toolbuilding, Neuroimaging, and Neuroinformatics

New Tools for Analyzing and Engineering Brain Circuits
Ed Boyden, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Understanding how neural circuits implement brain functions and how these computations go awry in brain disorders, is a top priority for neuroscience. Achieving this understanding will require new technologies. Over the last several years we have developed a rapidly-expanding suite of genetically-encoded reagents that, when expressed in specific neuron types in the nervous system, enable their electrical activities to be powerfully and precisely activated and silenced in response to pulses of light. I will briefly give an overview of the field, and then I will discuss a number of new tools for neural activation and silencing that we are developing, including new molecules with augmented amplitudes, improved safety profiles, novel color and light-sensitivity capabilities, and unique new capabilities. Second, we have begun to develop microfabricated and robotic hardware to enable complex and distributed neural circuits to be precisely controlled, and for the network-wide impact of a neural control event to be measured using distributed electrodes, fMRI, and automated intracellular neural recording. We explore how these tools can be used to enable systematic analysis of neural circuit functions in the fields of emotion, sensation, and movement, and in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Sequencing the Connectome
Anthony Zador, MD, PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

The brain is an extremely complex network, consisting of billions of neurons connected by trillions of synapses. The details of these connections—which neurons form synaptic connections with which other neurons—are crucial in determining brain function. Malformation of these connections during prenatal and early postnatal development can lead to mental retardation, autism or schizophrenia; loss of specific connections later in life is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. We are developing an entirely novel approach based on high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. Sequencing technology has not previously been applied in the context to neural connectivity. The appeal of using sequencing is that it is fast and cheap. Moreover, like microprocessor technology, sequencing technology is improving exponentially. An efficient method for determining the brain's wiring diagram would provide a foundation for understanding how neural circuits compute and could transform neuroscience research.

Imaging Neuronal Activity in the Freely Moving Animal: From the Eye to the Cortex
Jason N. D. Kerr, PhD, Network Imaging Group, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany

Motivation underlies the performance of self-determined behavior and is fundamental to decision making, especially with regard to seeking food, mates, and avoiding peril. As many decision making based behaviors in rodents involve a combination of head movements, eye movements, vestibular driven neuronal activity and multimodal active sensing of the environment to guide the behavior, studying the freely moving animal is paramount. To achieve this, what is also necessary is the precise tracking of the animal's movement and interaction with the environment. Here I will outline work from our group that focuses on how freely moving rodents use their vision during decision making tasks and resulting cortical activity. I will introduce methods that allow accurate recording of neuronal activity from populations of cortical neurons, using multi-photon imaging techniques, while simultaneously tracking behavior, using eye and head tracking techniques, during decision making in the freely moving rodent. The second half of the presentation will focus on recent results from our lab showing how rodents have a distinct eye movement strategy that is of major evolutionary benefit.

New Approaches for Correlated LM and 3D EM Applied to MULTISCALE CHALLENGES: Bridging Gaps in Knowledge and Understanding
Mark H. Ellisman, PhD, The National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR), University of California, San Diego

A grand goal in cell biology is to understand how the interplay of structural, chemical and electrical signals in and between cells gives rise to tissue properties, especially for complex tissues like nervous systems. New technologies are hastening progress as biologists make use of an increasingly powerful arsenal of tools and technologies for obtaining data, from the level of molecules to whole organs, and at the same time engage in the arduous and challenging process of adapting and assembling data at all scales of resolution and across disciplines into computerized databases. This talk will highlight projects in which development and application of new contrasting methods and imaging tools have allowed us to observe otherwise hidden relationships between cellular, subcellular and molecular constituents of cells, including those of nervous systems.
 
New chemistries for carrying out correlated light and electron microscopy will be described, as well as recent advances in large-scale high-resolution 3D reconstruction with LM, TEM and SEM based methods. Examples of next generation cell-centric image libraries and web-based multiscale information exploration environments for sharing and exploring these data will also be described.

Developing an International Neuroinformatics Infrastructure
Sean Hill, PhD, Karolinska Institute

The International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) was launched in 2005, following the proposal by the Global Science Forum of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to create an organization to coordinate an open international infrastructure to integrate heterogeneous neuroscience data and knowledge bases and enable new insights from analysis, modeling and simulation. Here we present the INCF multi-phase strategy to deploy such an infrastructure with specific capabilities and milestones. The first phase is to establish a globally federated data space with searchable metadata. The second phase will deploy an object-based data integration layer employing web services to ensure the unique identification of all data through ontologies and spatial coordinates, while using data models to access diverse data formats through standard interfaces. The third phase would enable standard workflow management for analysis, visualization, modeling and simulation can then be built on top of the data integration layer. The development of portal interfaces will be critical to provide interactive user access to data, analyses and simulation results. The aim of this infrastructure is to facilitate international sharing, publication and integration of neuroscience data across multiple levels and scales from genes to behavior.

Session 3: Advances in Tools, Technology and Methodology: Computational Models

Prediction in the Retina
Stephanie E. Palmer, PhD, University of Chicago

In the natural world, temporal correlations between events exist on many timescales, allowing organisms to anticipate the future state of their environments. A neural system that uses predictions to guide behavior must encode the future values of sensory inputs. This suggests a new approach to neural encoding. While most studies have, historically, sought to characterize what stimuli in the past gave rise to a response (the classical receptive field picture of encoding), we ask instead what stimuli those responses predict. We have found such 'predictive information' in the population responses of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the larval salamander. To quantify predictive information, we ask how much RGC responses at some time 'now' (Rp) tell us about the future state of the stimulus (Sf). This information, I(Rp;Sf), is bounded by correlations in the stimulus itself, I(Sp;Sf). For particular classes of stimuli, this bound can be calculated analytically. We have shown that certain patterns of population firing in the retina approach this bound, suggesting that the retina may be optimized for prediction. Coding for prediction may be a useful strategy for neural systems to adopt, making transfer of sensory information more efficient by compressing signals along dimensions relevant for behavior.

Coauthors: Olivier Marre, PhD2, Michael J. Berry, II, PhD3, William Bialek, PhD3
2Paris VI University, Paris, France
3Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

 

Bayesian Inference with Efficient Neural Population Codes
Alan A. Stocker, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

The accuracy with which the perceptual brain can infer the value of stimulus variables in the worlddepends on both, the amount of stimulus information that is represented in a population of sensory neurons (encoding) and the mechanism by which this information is subsequently retrieved from the population's response pattern (decoding).
 
Previous studies have mainly focused either on the encoding or the decoding aspect of the problem, providing evidence for two general optimality principles: The efficient coding hypothesis (Barlow 1961) states that neural representations are optimally adapted to encode a given stimulus ensemble, while the Bayesian hypothesis proposes that the brain is able to optimally decode a stimulus variable by combining sensory evidence with prior information (e.g. Knill/Richards 1999).
 
Here I present recent work of my laboratory in which we developed a new theoretical framework that functionally links optimal (efficient) encoding with optimal (Bayesian) decoding. More specifically, I demonstrate that efficient population codes allow the accurate emulation of Bayesian inference with a relative simple, neural decoding mechanism based on a generalized form of the population vector read-out. Stimulus priors (bottom-up) are intrinsically represented by the tuning curves distribution in the neural population, while top-down attentional priors can be incorporated by gain changes in neural firing. The framework makes specific predictions about perceptual behavior based on stimulus specific parameters such as stimulus prior, strength and time-constants, as well as physiological parameters such as spontaneous firing rates. The framework is a concrete example for the duality between neural representation and computation.

The Orchestral Brain: Coding with Correlated and Heterogeneous Neurons
Rava Azeredo da Silveira, PhD, Ecole Normal Supérieure, Paris

While single-cell activity may be well correlated with simple aspects of sensory stumuli, rich stimuli or subtly differing stimuli require concomitant coding by several neurons in a population. It is then natural to ask whether the nature of the coding is 'orchestral' in that it relies upon correlation and physiological diversity among cells. Positive correlations in the activity of neurons are widely observed in the brain and previous studies stipulate that these are at best marginally favorable, if not detrimental, to the fidelity of population codes, compared to independent codes. Here, we put forth a scenario in which positive correlations can enhance coding performance by astronomical factors. Specifically, the probability of discrimination error can be suppressed by many orders of magnitude. Likewise, the number of stimuli encoded—the capacity—can be enhanced by similarly large factors. These effects do not necessitate unrealistic correlation values and can occur for populations with as little as a few tens of neurons. The scenario relies upon 'lock-in' patterns of activity with which correlation relegates the noise in irrelevant modes. We further demonstrate that, quite generically, coding fidelity is enhanced by physiological heterogeneity. Finally, we formulate heuristic arguments as to the plausibility of 'lock-in' patterns and possible experimental tests of the theoretical proposal.

View from the Top: What Probabilistic Models of Perception Can Teach Us about Neural Computation
Wei Ji Ma, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine

Sensory information is often noisy and ambiguous and perception is uncertain as a result. Under such circumstances, organisms can maximize their performance by using a decision strategy known as probabilistic or Bayesian inference. In simple perceptual tasks such as cue combination, Bayesian models describe human behavior extremely well. Here, we show that the formalism extends to more cognitive tasks, where inference is typically categorical and hierarchical, and resource limitations might play a role. As examples, we will discuss visual search, change detection, and categorization under ambiguity. Probabilistic models of perceptual and cognitive behavior provide strong constraints on theories of the underlying neural computations and yield testable predictions for physiological experiments. We will illustrate this using cue combination, a realm in which these physiological predictions have partially been confirmed.

Computing Intelligence: Mind, Brain and Machine
Tomaso Poggio, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

I conjecture that the sample complexity of object recognition is mostly due to geometric image transformations and that a main goal of the ventral stream is to learn-and-discount image transformations. The theory predicts that the size of the receptive fields determines which transformations are learned during development; that the transformation represented in each area determines the tuning of the neurons in the area; and that class specific transformations are learned and represented at the top of the ventral stream hierarchy. If the theory were true, the ventral system would be a mirror of the symmetry properties of motions in the physical world.

Travel & Lodging

Event Location

Aspen Meadows Resort
845 Meadows Road
Aspen, CO 81611

Directions to the Aspen Meadows Resort.

Other Suggested Hotel Accommodations in Aspen

Hotel Aspen
110 W. Main Street
Aspen, CO 81611
Phone: 800.527.7369

Molly Gibson Lodge
101 W. Main Street
Aspen, CO 81611
Phone: 888.649.5982

The Annabelle Inn
232 W. Main Street
Aspen, CO 81611
Phone: 970.925.3822

The Limelight Lodge
355 S. Monarch Street
Aspen, CO 81611
Phone: 800.433.0832

St. Moritz Lodge
334 W. Hyman Ave
Aspen, CO 81611
Phone: 800.817.2069