Archaeology of an Emerging Landscape of Power and Enslavement in Early 17th-century Barbados

Archaeology of an Emerging Landscape of Power and Enslavement in Early 17th-century Barbados

Monday, January 28, 2013

Wenner-Gren Foundation

Presented By

Presented by the Anthropology Section

 

Archaeological and historical research in Barbados is exploring the transition from smaller scale farming to the capital and labor intensive agro-industrial complex that emerged by the end of the seventeenth-century. The system of slavery that emerged on agro-industrial sugar plantations in Barbados in the mid-17th century set in motion the large scale exploitive system of plantation slavery in the British Caribbean and dramatically impacted social systems on a global scale, with particular impacts throughout the Americas and Africa. This paper focuses on a combination of material and spatial data, including plantation maps and material culture recovered from early plantations in Barbados, to explore an emerging landscape of power, indenture, enslavement, colonialism, and capitalism.

A reception will precede the meeting at 6:00 pm.

Speakers

Douglas V. Armstrong

Syracuse University

Christopher Matthews

Montclair State University

This meeting is free, but registration is required.

Travel & Lodging

Meeting Location

The Wenner-Gren Foundation

470 Park Avenue South, between 31st and 32nd Streets
8th Floor
New York, NY 10016