Nuclear Disaster, Environmental Health, and Human Rights in the MarshallIslands: Hard-learned Lessons in Praxis, Ethics, and Power

FREE

for Members

Nuclear Disaster, Environmental Health, and Human Rights in the MarshallIslands: Hard-learned Lessons in Praxis, Ethics, and Power

Monday, October 21, 2013

Wenner-Gren Foundation

Presented By

Presented by the Anthropology Section

 

Environmental anthropologist Barbara Rose Johnston discusses methods, findings, ethical quandaries, and political outcomes from her work documenting the consequential damages of nuclear disaster and advocating for the human right to a healthy environment. This talk is illustrated with case-specific examples from her service as an expert advisor to the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claims Tribunal, a civil society advisor supporting a UN Special Rapporteur investigation into nuclear testing, toxic waste, environmental contamination and continuing human rights abuse, and a civil society delegate at the UN Human Rights Commission 21st session (September 2012).

A reception will precede the meeting at 6:00 pm.

Registration Pricing

This meeting is free, but you will need to register in advance.

Speakers

Discussant

Glenn H. Alcalay

Montclair State University

Speaker

Barbara Rose Johnston

Center for Political Ecology

Barbara Rose Johnston is the Senior Research Fellow for Environment, Health and Human Rights at the Center for Political Ecology (Santa Cruz, CA) and Michigan State University Adjunct Professor of Anthropology.

She holds a BS in Anthropology (UC Berkeley), MS in Environmental Science(San Jose State University), and a PhD in Anthropology (University of Massachusetts, Amherst). She is an expert in the fields of human rights, political ecology, biocultural diversity, climate change & climate justice, water, energy & mineral resource development, and nuclear militarism. Her work on environmental justice and human rights garnered her the 2002 AAA Solon T. Kimball Award for Public and Applied Anthropology and the 2007 Lourdes Arzipe Award for Policy, Anthropology and Environmental Issues. Her coauthored book, Consequential Damages of Nuclear War, received the Society for Medical Anthropology's 2011 Millennium Book Award. Recent work includes serving as a UNESCO Advisor and editor-in-chief for the UNESCO/Springer 2012 text "Water, Cultural Diversity and Global Environmental Change: Emerging Trends, Sustainable Futures?", supporting a UN Special Rapporteur investigation into the human rights consequences of nuclear weapons testing in the Marshall Islands, and assisting a US Congressional review of human rights abuse and remaining obligations associated with a World Bank-financed dam in Guatemala.

Travel & Lodging

Meeting Location

The Wenner-Gren Foundation

470 Park Avenue South, between 31st and 32nd Streets
8th Floor
New York, NY 10016