Lyceum Society: How to be a Religious Scientist: Lessons from History in Thinking about God and Nature

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Lyceum Society: How to be a Religious Scientist: Lessons from History in Thinking about God and Nature

Monday, February 3, 2014

The New York Academy of Sciences

Presented By

Presented by the Lyceum Society

 

The Lyceum Society comprises the Academy's retired and semi-retired members.
Talks cover various scientific fields. All Academy members are welcome.

All Lyceum meetings (except December) are Brown Bag lunches.

Brown Bag: 11:30 AM
Brief-Brief: 12:45 PM
Lecture & Discussion: 1:00–3:00 PM

Brief-Brief Presentation:
What to do in a Medical Emergency: CPR, Heimlich Maneuver
Speaker: Dr. Joy Zagoren

Main Presentation:
How to be a Religious Scientist: Lessons from History in Thinking about God and Nature

Speaker: Dr. Matt Stanley

In the twenty-first century, science and religion are often thought of as completely incompatible ways of thinking. But historically, many scientists have also been deeply religious. We will examine how actual scientists have seen their religious beliefs as compatible with, and even helpful to, their scientific work. History can show us that our modern assumptions about how science and religion should interact are not necessary or inevitable, and that those two categories can have surprisingly fruitful relations.

Speaker Bios

Dr. Matthew Stanley is an Associate Professor in the History and Philosophy of Science at the NYU-Gallatin School. He received his B.Sc. & B.A. in Optical Engineering & Religion (resp.), University of Rochester, 1998; M.A. Astronomy, Harvard University; and Ph.D. History of Science, Harvard University, 2004. He is the author of Practical Mystic: Religion, Science, and A. S. Eddington, which examines how scientists reconcile their religious beliefs and professional lives. Currently, he is writing a book that explores how science changed from its historical theistic foundations to its modern naturalistic ones. Professor Stanley is also part of a nationwide NSF-funded effort to use the humanities to improve science education in the college classroom. He has held Fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study, the British Academy, and the Max Planck Institute. He currently runs the New York City History of Science Working Group.

Dr. Joy Zagoren has a B.S., M.S., and a PhD in Medical Sciences from NYU (awarded with distinction). She taught Physical Ed in Great Neck High School and Creedmoor State Hospital and served as a Research Associate in Brain Research/Neuropathology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, as well as Assistant Professor in Neurology at Stoneybrook School of Medicine. Dr. Zagoden has published numerous research papers and is the author of “The Node of Ranzier”.

Registration Pricing

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Nonmember$20
Nonmember (Student / Postdoc / Resident / Fellow)$10

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