Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy | The New York Academy of Sciences

Beginning Thursday, August 16, at 4:00PM ET, we will be undergoing a planned service upgrade, which will end Friday, August 17, approximatly at 12:00PM ET. During this time period you may not be able to log in, register for an event, or make a donation via the website. We appreciate your patience, and apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy

Available via

WEBINAR

FREE

for Members

Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy

Thursday, September 7, 2017

The New York Academy of Sciences, 7 World Trade Center, 250 Greenwich St Fl 40, New York, USA

Presented By

 

Academic training in the sciences is designed to prepare students to develop an independent and rigorous mindset based on the scientific method. And yet, severe gender biases persist and continue to plague academic environments.

There are several hurdles women face when they attempt to advance in their science careers. From institutional barriers, cultural challenges, persistent biases, to failed policies, women are still struggling to compete with their male counterparts. According to a 2015 study, women are more likely to have unconventional career paths and are at a higher risk of leaving the academic track due to personal factors (Ramos et al., 2015).

A recent report by Elsevier (2017) showed that while the number of women researchers in academia has increased in the last 20 years, women researchers publish fewer papers and are less likely to collaborate internationally or to engage in cross sector research. This report collected data from 27 countries for over 20 years. On the other hand, a study on gender inequality in Mexico found that when factors such as promotion to senior academic ranks and institutional selectivity are controlled for, women produce higher quality research than men (Rivera Leon et al., 2016). However, these women are underrepresented in labs that are lead by elite male faculty. In labs run by biological male scientists, women made up 36% of postdoctoral researchers and 47% of grad students (Sheltzer & Smith, 2014).

At this event we will present the findings of the Elsevier report Gender in the Global Research Landscape, including case studies of global and local programs, and will host a panel with scientists in academia and in non-academic enterprises to discuss the challenges women in academia face when pursuing careers in STEM. Panelists will also discuss examples of successful initiatives to advance women in STEM. The audience will have a chance to engage with the speakers and panelists during the panel and at the networking reception.

This event is open to the scientific community and will be broadcast via webinar.

Event: 6:00-8:30 PM | Reception: 8:30-9:30 PM

Papers cited:

Sheltzer JM, Smith JC (2014) Elite male faculty in the life sciences employ fewer women. PNAS 111 (28): 1017-10112.

Elsevier Report (2017) Gender in the Global Research Landscape

Rivera de Leon L, Mairesse J, Cowan R (2016) An econometric investigation of the productivity gender gap in Mexican research, and a simulation study of the effects on scientific performance of policy scenarios to promote gender equality. United Nations-Merit

Gonzalez Ramos AM, Navarrete Cortes J, Cabrera Moreno E (2015) Dancers in the dark: scientific careers according to a gender blind model of promotion. Interdiscip Sci Rev 20 (2): 182-203.

Registration

Member
$0
Nonmember
$40
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
$30
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
$0
Member
$0
Nonmember
$20
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
$15
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
$0

Speakers and Panelists

Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy
Ann Gabriel, Academic Relations & Research Relations, Elsevier (keynote)
Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy
Anthony Boccanfuso, PhD, University at Industry Demonstration Partnership
Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy
Jason M. Sheltzer, PhD, Cold Spring Harbor
Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy
Gilda Barabino, PhD, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering​
Academia Challenges for Women in STEM: Training, Discrimination, and Policy
Carol Shoshkes Reiss, PhD, New York University

Sponsor

Thursday

September 07, 2017

6:00 PM

Welcome Remarks by the Academy

6:15 PM

Keynote by Elsevier on Women in STEM Report

6:45 PM

Q&A About Report

7:00 PM

Panel: Training Challenges Faced by Women Pursuing Careers in STEM

8:30 PM

Reception

9:30 PM

Event Closes

To view full attendee list, you must first register for the event, then log in to the Academy website. This list is provided for the personal, noncommercial and informational use only of event attendees, in a manner that is consistent with the New York Academy of Sciences’ mission, goals and activities.
  • Adelphi University

  • American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering

  • City College of New York - The Grove School of Engineering

  • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

  • Columbia University

  • CSHL

  • Gerstner Sloan Kettering

  • Google, Inc.

  • Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.

  • New York University

  • New York University College of Dentistry

  • New York University Medical Center

  • NYP Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical College

  • NYU - The Sackler Institute

  • Oregon State University

  • Pratt Institute

  • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

  • St. John's University

  • The Albert Einstein College of Medicine

  • The American Museum of Natural History

  • The City College of New York, CUNY* CCNY

  • The City University of New York CUNY

  • The CUNY Graduate Center

  • The Elsevier Foundation

  • The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

  • The New York Academy of Sciences NYAS

  • The Ohio State University

  • The Rockefeller University

  • The State University of New York

  • The University Industry Demonstration Partnership

This site uses cookies.
Learn more.

×

This website uses cookies. Some of the cookies we use are essential for parts of the website to operate while others offer you a better browsing experience. You give us your permission to use cookies, by continuing to use our website after you have received the cookie notification. To find out more about cookies on this website and how to change your cookie settings, see our Privacy policy and Terms of Use.