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The Inner Lives of Passively Suicidal Americans: Why Racism isn't Just Bad for Black People

FREE

for Members

The Inner Lives of Passively Suicidal Americans: Why Racism Isn't Just Bad for Black People

Monday, September 24, 2018

Roosevelt House, 47-49 E 65th St, New York, NY 10065

Presented By

The Anthropology Section

 

Inequalities are increasing locally and globally on a vast scale. At the same time that these disparities, which are experienced by racialized groups, certain nationalities, by women, poor people, immigrants and the elderly, are explained by media and politicians as the natural and unavoidable order of things.  How are we to understand these relationships between untold wealth and growing immiseration?  How do we understand the way the stories about inequality are told? Who has access to information about the production of inequality? Who is able to contest its production?

Often inequality and equality are researched and discussed in isolation. Yet, anthropological research in archeology, linguistics, human biology, and socio-cultural anthropology has the capacity to both document the grim actualities of the current conjuncture and to show how inequality is linked to systems of production, distribution and domination. Both in the past and present the issues of the equality and inequality are inextricably linked and connected to the way the way disparities are explained, legitimated, and turned into the taken-for-granted.

This lecture series takes a global perspective on the entanglements of wealth, poverty, and inequality as well as the popularization of narratives of inevitable disparity and the silencing of struggles for social justice and equality. Speakers will explore these entanglement including the human experience and materiality of equality, their mediation through different channels of communication, their ideological justifications through concepts of race, gender, ethnicity, nationality, hereditary, class and status, and the punitive power to enforce these ideas through incarceration, surveillance, criminalization. We ask how knowledge about power and inequality empowers resistance and struggle.

Location: Roosevelt House, 47-49 E 65th St, New York, NY 10065

A dinner and wine reception will precede the talk. Buffet dinner begins at 5:45 PM. ($20 contribution for dinner guests/free for students). 

Lectures begin at 6:30 PM and are free and open to the public, but registration is required. 

Registration

Speaker

Carolyn Rouse
Carolyn Rouse, Princeton University

Discussant

Julie Livingston
Julie Livingston, New York University
To view full attendee list, you must first register for the event, then log in to the Academy website. This list is provided for the personal, noncommercial and informational use only of event attendees, in a manner that is consistent with the New York Academy of Sciences’ mission, goals and activities.
  • Barnard College

  • Cornell University

  • John Jay College of Criminal Justice

  • Lupoff Friends & Family Interests

  • New York University

  • Pace University

  • The City University of New York (CUNY)

  • The New York Academy of Sciences NYAS

  • Weill Cornell Medicine