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CRISPR: New Frontiers

CRISPR: New Frontiers

Monday, February 24, 2020, 9:30 AM - 6:00 PM

The New York Academy of Sciences, 7 World Trade Center, 250 Greenwich St Fl 40, New York

Presented By

CRISPR Discussion Group

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

The discovery of CRISPR–Cas systems and their development for gene-editing applications have revolutionized biomedical science. These systems are pervasive within the genomes of bacteria and archaea, where they provide adaptive immunity by targeting foreign nucleic acids for degradation. An incredibly diverse and rapidly growing set of CRISPR systems have been identified, and recent work harnessing them to target and modify specific RNA and DNA sequences has enabled a multitude of applications, such as genome editing, transcriptional modulation, forward genetic screens, lineage tracing, and more.

The CRISPR: New Frontiers meeting will bring together researchers uncovering the cellular, molecular, and biochemical pathways of CRISPR-associated proteins, DNA repair pathways, and applications in diverse organisms, including for human health and disease biology.


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Registration

Member
By 01/13/2020
$90
After 01/13/2020
$130
Additional Options +
Evening Event
$12
Nonmember Academia, Faculty, etc.
By 01/13/2020
$180
After 01/13/2020
$260
Additional Options +
Evening Event
$25
Nonmember Corporate, Other
By 01/13/2020
$250
After 01/13/2020
$350
Additional Options +
Evening Event
$25
Nonmember Not for Profit
By 01/13/2020
$180
After 01/13/2020
$260
Additional Options +
Evening Event
$25
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
By 01/13/2020
$100
After 01/13/2020
$145
Additional Options +
Evening Event
$25
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
By 01/13/2020
$50
After 01/13/2020
$70
Additional Options +
Evening Event
$12
Earlybird Registration:
0
days
left

Keynote Speakers

Luciano Marraffini, PhD
Luciano Marraffini, PhD

The Rockefeller University

Feng Zhang
Feng Zhang, PhD

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Speakers

Brittany Adamson
Britt Adamson, PhD

Princeton University

Clifford Brangwynne
Clifford Brangwynne, PhD

Princeton University

Sidi Chen
Sidi Chen, PhD

Yale School of Medicine

Tuuli Lappalainen
Tuuli Lappalainen, PhD

Columbia University and New York Genome Center

Thomas Norman, PhD
Thomas Norman, PhD

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Neville Sanjana
Neville Sanjana, PhD

New York Genome Center and New York University

Sanne Klompe
Sanne Klompe

Columbia University (Sternberg lab)

Stephanie Sansbury
Stephanie Sansbury

University of Pennsylvania (Shalem lab)

Nadine Schrode
Nadine Schrode, PhD

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Brennand lab)

Scientific Organizing Committee

Britt Adamson, PhD
Britt Adamson, PhD

Princeton University

Maria Jasin, PhD
Maria Jasin, PhD

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Neville Sanjana
Neville Sanjana, PhD

New York Genome Center and New York University

Samuel Sternberg, PhD
Samuel Sternberg, PhD

Columbia University

Alison Carley, PhD
Alison Carley, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences

Sonya Dougal, PhD
Sonya Dougal, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences

Monday

February 24, 2020

9:30 AM

Registration and Breakfast

Session 1

10:00 AM

Introductory remarks

10:15 AM

Keynote Address: Scavenging for dead DNA: how CRISPR-Cas systems make new memories of infection

Speaker

Luciano Marraffini, PhD
The Rockefeller University
11:00 AM

Transposon-encoded CRISPR-Cas systems direct RNA-guided DNA integration

Speaker

Sanne Klompe
Columbia University (Sternberg lab)
11:15 AM

High-resolution Interrogation of the Cellular DNA Repair

Speaker

Britt Adamson, PhD
Princeton University
11:45 AM

Liquid nuclear condensates: in, on, and around the genome

Speaker

Clifford Brangwynne, PhD
Princeton University
12:15 PM

Lunch

Session 2

1:30 PM

New frontiers in high-throughput genome engineering and functional genomics

Speaker

Neville Sanjana, PhD
New York University and New York Genome Center
2:00 PM

Finding and interpreting genetic interactions using Perturbseq

Speaker

Thomas Norman, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
2:30 PM

CRISPR-based functional evaluation of common Schizophrenia risk variants

Speaker

Nadine Schrode, PhD
Mount Sinai School of Medicine (Brennand lab)
2:45 PM

In vivo gene editing and immunotherapy

Speaker

Sidi Chen, PhD
Yale School of Medicine

T cells became the central focus of new cancer therapeutics. Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting T cell signaling pathways and cellular therapeutics utilizing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have shown success in the clinic. Discovery of previously unknown genes that modulate T cell function is of urgent need to open different avenues for immunotherapies, as a large fraction of patients still do not respond to, or have undesired side effects to currently approved ones. Systematic approaches to identify new regulators of T cell functions in vivo can provide potentially orthogonal or complementary opportunities. We recently performed in vivo CRISPR screens in CD8 cytotoxic T cells, both in a genome-scale and in a focused manner, in tumor models of immunotherapy (Dong et al. 2019 Cell). Furthermore, we developed a novel AAV-SleepingBeauty system that enhanced the power of genetic screening in primary T cells (Ye et al. 2019 Nature Biotechnology). Our screen re-discovered prime immunotherapy targets such as PD-1, TIM-3 and LAG3, as well as previously undocumented targets. We characterized novel targets such as DHX37, ODC1, MGAT5 and PDIA3 for their activity in mouse and human CD8 T cells including CAR-Ts.

Current major types of immunotherapy include checkpoint blockade, adoptive cell transfer, human recombinant cytokines, and cancer vaccines. However, immunotherapy has met challenges in immunologically cold tumors. These challenges urge for new types of immunotherapies that are more potent and potentially less toxic. Recently, we have developed CRISPRa-mediated Multiplexed Activation of Endogenous Genes as an Immunotherapy (MAEGI) (Wang et al. 2019 Nature Immunology, in press). The CRISPR activation (CRISPRa) system uses a catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9), enabling simple and flexible gene expression regulation through dCas9-transcriptional activators paired with single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). This enables precise targeting of large gene pools of endogenous genes in a flexible manner. We demonstrate that MAEGI has therapeutic efficacy across three tumor types. Mechanistically, our preliminary work showed that MAEGI treatment elicits anti-tumor immune responses by recruiting effector T cells and remodeling the tumor microenvironment. We will perform advanced development, characterization and optimization of MAEGI, as a novel immune-gene therapy approach to elicit a potent and specific immune response to tumors based on their unique genetic composition.

3:15 PM

Coffee Break

Session 3

3:45 PM

Functional genetic variation in humans: from population associations to experimental follow-up

Speaker

Tuuli Lappalainen, PhD
Columbia University and New York Genome Center
4:15 PM

A FACS-based CRISPR/Cas9 knockout screen uncovers novel regulators of protein quality

Speaker

Stephanie Sansbury
University of Pennsylvania (Shalem lab)
4:30 PM

Keynote Address: Genome Editing: The Present and the Future

Speaker

Feng Zhang, PhD
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
5:15 PM

Networking Reception

6:15 PM

Adjourn