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Frontiers in Circadian Medicine

WEBINAR

Only

Frontiers in Circadian Medicine

Monday, November 2, 2020, 11:00 AM - 4:45 PM EST

WEBINAR

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

Biological rhythms are relevant for almost every aspect of an organism’s life, from adapting physiology to the night-and-day cycle of the environment to synchronizing social behavior with other organisms. In 2017 the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to Jeff Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young for their groundbreaking contribution to the understanding of the cellular circadian clock. Since then, research in chronobiology has seen an astonishing renaissance. This one-day symposium highlights the translational aspects of chronobiology research, from developing drugs that target the biological clock for treating sleep and mood disorders to optimizing efficacy of drugs by timing administration in alignment with circadian rhythm; from uncovering the genetic basis for different chronotypes to understanding the impact of “metabolic jetlag” and other circadian dysfunction on the immune system, metabolic syndrome and neurodegenerative disease.

Register for a public panel discussion on Your Internal Clock and Your Health to learn how your internal clock works and how it affects your health, mood, and productivity.   

Registration

Member
$30
Nonmember Academia, Faculty, etc.
$65
Nonmember Corporate, Other
$85
Nonmember Not for Profit
$65
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
$45
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
$15

Scientific Organizing Committee

Steve Kay, PhD

Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California

Katja Lamia, PhD

The Scripps Research Institute

Amita Sehgal, PhD

University of Pennsylvania

Michael W. Young, PhD

The Rockefeller University

Sonya Dougal, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences

Barbara Knappmeyer, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences

Featured Speaker

Michael W. Young
Michael W. Young, PhD, Nobel Laureate

The Rockefeller University

Speakers

Charles A. Czeisler, MD, PhD
Charles A. Czeisler, MD, PhD

Harvard Medical School

Garret A. FitzGerald
Garret A. FitzGerald, MD

Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Ying-Hui Fu, PhD
Ying-Hui Fu, PhD

University of California, San Francisco

John B. Hogenesch
John B. Hogenesch, PhD

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Lora Hooper
Lora Hooper, PhD

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Katja Lamia, PhD
Katja Lamia, PhD

The Scripps Research Institute

Tami A. Martino
Tami A. Martino, PhD

University of Guelph

Carrie Partch
Carrie Partch, PhD

University of California, Santa Cruz

Amita Sehgal, PhD
Amita Sehgal, PhD

Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Joseph Takahashi
Joseph Takahashi

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Monday

November 02, 2020

11:00 AM

Welcome Remarks

Speaker

Barbara Knappmeyer, PhD
The New York Academy of Sciences
11:05 AM

Opening Remarks

Speaker

Steve Kay, PhD
University of Southern California

Session 1: Molecular Basis of the Cellular Clock

11:15 AM

Overview

Speaker

Joseph Takahashi, PhD
University of Texas Southwestern
11:40 AM

Morning Larks and Night Owls Shed Light on the Molecular Circadian Clock

Speaker

Carrie Partch, PhD
University of California, Santa Cruz

Our lives are intimately linked to Earth’s 24-hour solar cycle via circadian clocks that coordinate physiology and behavior into rhythms that coincide with the day/night cycle. By integrating structural biology, biochemistry, and cell biology, we’ve been working to identify how dedicated clock proteins interact with one another to establish a deeper understanding of the transcription-based feedback loop that underlies circadian rhythms in mammals. Recent insights into the genetic basis of morning lark and night owl behavior have shed light on key molecular steps in the clock that play a particularly powerful role in determining the intrinsic timing of circadian clocks in humans. Some of these recent advances will be discussed to explore the biochemical basis for circadian timekeeping.

12:05 PM

Metabolism, the Microbiome, and the Circadian Clock

Speaker

Lora Hooper, PhD
University of Texas Southwestern

The mammalian intestine is colonized with ~100 trillion bacteria (the microbiota) that impact host metabolism and can drive obesity. However, we know almost nothing about the molecular mechanisms used by the microbiota to regulate metabolism and promote obesity. My lab is addressing this question by studying microbiota interactions with the intestinal epithelium. Our work has illuminated two key mechanisms so far. First, we have discovered that the microbiota regulates lipid absorption, storage and obesity in mice through the circadian transcription factor NFIL3 (Wang et al., Science 357, p912-916 [2017]). Second, we have found that the enzyme histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) also integrates microbial and circadian signals to regulate intestinal lipid absorption and promote obesity (Kuang et al., Science 365, p 1428–1434 [2019]). Together, these findings provide mechanistic insight into how the intestinal microbiota regulates lipid metabolism and obesity. Our findings also pinpoint key molecular links among the microbiota, the circadian clock, and host metabolism.

12:30 PM

Lunch Break

Session 2: Early-Stage Translational Research

1:00 PM

Featured Talk: Chronic Social Isolation Signals Starvation in the Drosophila Brain and Reduces Sleep

Speaker

Michael Young, PhD
The Rockefeller University
1:25 PM

Providing a Basis for Chronotherapy in Cancer

Speaker

Amita Sehgal, PhD
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
1:50 PM

Tumor-Associated Mutations in the Circadian Repressor CRY2 Influence P53 Activity and Cell Growth

Speaker

Katja Lamia, PhD
The Scripps Research Institute
2:15 PM

Building Circadian Medicine in a Pediatric Hospital

Speaker

John Hogenesh, PhD
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

The past several decades has seen an explosion of growth in mechanistic understanding of circadian clocks in several model organisms and in humans. However, translation of that knowledge into actionable medical interventions has been slow to non-existent. Here, I will discuss our efforts to develop circadian medicine in a pediatric hospital. I will talk about our recent progress in understanding the molecular output of the clock in the mouse and humans, including identifying new opportunities for circadian dosing time in improving drug action -- hypothesis-driven, mechanistic circadian medicine. I will talk about our efforts to test these hypotheses prospectively in model organisms and retrospectively in large clinical databases. Finally, I will discuss future opportunities and challenges.

2:40 PM

Break

Session 3: Clinical-Stage Research

2:50 PM

Sexual Dimprophism in Chronobiology

Speaker

Garret A. Fitzgerald, MD
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Using mice subjected to a jet lag paradigm we take a multi-omics and behavioral approach to provide evidence that females are more resilient to circadian disruption than males. This is consistent with some prior evidence in the literature from our own work and that of others. This and reflect adaptation to the biological imperative. Although data in humans are largely indirect, interrogation of the UK Biobank provides evidence consistent with this hypothesis. Differences between the sexes must be considered when interrogation circadian biology.

3:15 PM

Circadian Medicine: A Pill to Cure Heart Attacks?

Speaker

Tami Martino, PhD
University of Guelph
3:40 PM

Break

3:50 PM

Bridging the Gap Between Human Genes and Sleep Behavior

Speaker

Ying-Hui Fu, PhD
University of California, San Francisco
4:15 PM

TBD

Speaker

Charles A.Czeisler, MD, PhD
Harvard Medical School
4:40 PM

Closing Remarks

4:45 PM

Adjourn