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Pandemic Diseases Preparedness and Response

WEBINAR

Only

Pandemic Diseases Preparedness and Response

Monday, June 22, 2020, 10:30 AM - 4:00 PM EDT

Online

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

The inevitable has happened, and we, as a world, were unprepared. Even before the new coronavirus, the number and diversity of epidemics has grown in the last three decades. But the ability of governments, communities, and individuals to anticipate, detect, and effectively respond to epidemics with pandemic potential encountered several roadblocks. Gathering world-class leaders from the fields of public health, epidemiology, and national security, this meeting will cover the basic science of pandemics, the evolution of emerging pathogens, therapeutics and non-pharmaceutical countermeasures, hotspot prediction, and current weakness in global preparation strategies. Ultimately, this symposium will highlight lessons from both the near and distant past, and illuminate the measures needed to shore up the globe for next time.

Registration

Member
$30
Nonmember Academia, Faculty, etc.
$65
Nonmember Corporate, Other
$85
Nonmember Not for Profit
$65
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
$45
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
$15

Organizing Committee

Luciana Borio, MD
Luciana Borio, MD

In-Q-Tel

Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH
Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Melanie Brickman Borchard, PhD, MSc
Melanie Brickman Borchard, PhD, MSc

New York Academy of Sciences

Kari Fischer, PhD
Kari Fischer, PhD

New York Academy of Sciences

Speakers

Luciana Borio
Luciana Borio, MD

In-Q-Tel

David Heymann, MD, DTM&H, CBE
David Heymann, MD, DTM&H, CBE

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Rebecca Katz
Rebecca Katz, PhD, MPH

Georgetown University

Larry Kerr
Larry Kerr, PhD

US. Department of Health and Human Services

Nicole Lurie, MD, MSPH
Nicole Lurie, MD, MSPH

Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations

Syra Madad, DHSC, MS, MCP
Syra Madad, DHSC, MS, MCP

New York City Health + Hospitals

Beth Maldin, MPH
Beth Maldin, MPH

NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Maria Julia Marinissen, PhD
Maria Julia Marinissen, PhD

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH
Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH

University of Minnesota

Gerald W. Parker, Jr., DVM, PhD
Gerald W. Parker, Jr., DVM, PhD

Texas A&M University

Oyewale Tomori
Oyewale Tomori, DVM, PhD

Redeemer's University

Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH
Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Monday

June 22, 2020

10:30 AM

Welcome Remarks

Speaker

Kari Fischer, PhD
New York Academy of Sciences

Session 1: Lessons from the Past

10:45 AM

SARS and Other Coronaviruses - Old and New Lessons

Speaker

David L. Heymann, MD
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
11:00 AM

Nonpharmaceutical Interventions in Influenza Pandemics 1918-2009: Lessons Learned for Pandemic Preparedness

Speaker

Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPI), also known as community mitigation measures, are actions that individuals and communities can take to help slow the spread of influenza and other infectious diseases. When a novel influenza A virus with pandemic potential emerges, NPIs are the most readily available set of interventions to slow down its transmission in communities. Often cited as the first line of defense, NPIs are especially important during the initial months of an evolving pandemic while pandemic vaccines may not yet be available.
In this talk, we will review NPI use during the influenza pandemics of 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009 in the United States and summarize how the lessons learned were used for further integration of NPIs in pandemic preparedness.

11:15 AM

COVID19: Lessons Forgotten for War Front Preparation

Speaker

Oyewale Tomori, DVM, PhD
Redeemer's University

Africa is a verdant pasture for emerging and re-emerging pathogens. Sub Saharan Africa has combated Ebola, HIV, and tuberculosis epidemics and regular annual, sporadic, and concurrent outbreaks. It is therefore expected that these countries would have acquired a high level of disease response capacity. However, the arrival of covid19 in Egypt, (N. Africa) on 14 February and Nigeria (SSA) on 27 February 2020, and subsequent response by many African countries once again demonstrated their glaring unpreparedness. As of 7 June 2020, African countries had reported 184,333 covid19 cases and 5,071 deaths. According to the African CDC, as of January 2020, only two countries (South Africa and Senegal) were able to test for COVID19. Although two months later, the number of countries with capacity to test for covid19 had increased to 43, the critical shortage of test kits continue to hamper the effective performance of and ability to conduct tests needed to accurately determine and map out the burden of covid19 disease. The long years of neglect of the health system has led to poor health care delivery in many of the countries, with acute shortages of critical care beds and personal protective equipment PPE for the protection of frontline health workers. With a pandemic, and the global demand for these and other essential commodities – test kits, PPE, swabs, reagents, test cartridges, and other commodities- Africa is left, often dependent on donor funds, to compete for these scarce commodities. Many African countries, in combating covid19, are operating on lessons forgotten from past epidemics as they make ammunition of war against the covid19 invasion at the battle front.

11:30 AM

Discussion and Audience Q&A

11:45 AM

Break

Session 2: International Coordination and Response

11:55 AM

Regional Coordination of Pandemic Preparedness and Response

Speaker

Maria Julia Marinissen, PhD
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
12:10 PM

Global Governance for Pandemic Preparedness and Response

Speaker

Rebecca Katz, PhD, MPH
Georgetown University
12:25 PM

Global Coordination of Pandemic Preparedness and Response

Speaker

Larry Kerr, PhD
US. Department of Health and Human Services
12:40 PM

Discussion and Audience Q&A

12:55 PM

Break

Session 3: Domestic Challenges, Past and Present

1:25 PM

Title to Be Announced

Speaker

Nicole Lurie, MD, MSPH
Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations
1:40 PM

Lessons Observed and Not Applied to Lessons Learned

Speaker

Gerald W. Parker, Jr., DVM, PhD
Texas A&M University

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, emerged late in 2019 and quickly spread with devastating consequences around the world. The COVID-19 pandemic caught public health and political leaders unprepared to take quick and decisive action knowing that infectious disease outbreaks with pandemic potential have occurred with increased frequency for at least twenty years. Despite the growing threat, pandemic preparedness rarely received policy and resourcing priority, and lessons observed after each crisis were not applied to sustained lessons learned. Crises from SARS in 2002 to Ebola in 2018 share repeated weaknesses that are summarized as failures in 1) leadership and accountability; 2) collaboration; 3) coordination; 4) communication; and 5) innovation. It is difficult to predict how the SARS-CoV-2 virus will evolve, but we must remain vigilant and prepare for the next phases of the COVID-19 response whether vaccines are fielded or not. We must also prepare for the next novel infectious disease outbreak as a national security priority and turn long-standing lessons observed into sustained lessons learned. The preparedness enterprises must adopt a forward-thinking posture to anticipate future threats, recognize the importance of global one health security, and utilize after action learning to not only improve response, but also innovate to implement new prevention policies and strategies.

1:55 PM

Discussion and Audience Q&A

2:10 PM

Break

Session 4: The City-Level Response

2:20 PM

Title to Be Announced

Speaker

Syra Madad, DHSC, MS, MCP
New York City Health + Hospitals
2:35 PM

NYC Health Department Response to COVID-19

Speaker

Beth Maldin, MPH
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

This presentation will describe the NYC public health response to COVID-19 and the key activities that occurred during each phase of the response. The presentation will reflect on how the response changed over time, the challenges faced, and the opportunities that lay ahead.

2:50 PM

Discussion and Q&A

3:05 PM

Break

Session 5: Reflections and the Future of Preparedness

3:15 PM

COVID-19, Infectious Disesases

Speaker

Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH
University of Minnesota
3:30 PM

Title to Be Announced

Speaker

Luciana Borio, MD
In-Q-Tel
3:45 PM

Discussion and Audience Q&A

4:00 PM

Event Concludes

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