In an effort to support global initiatives to contain the spread of the new coronavirus (COVID-19), the Academy is moving to an online platform or postponing all meetings and events intended to be held in person through April 30, 2020. Please check here for more information, including Academy programs on COVID-19, and links to the latest advisories from public health officials.

We are experiencing intermittent technical difficulties. At this time, you may not be able to log in, register for an event, or make a donation via the website. We appreciate your patience, and apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

This site uses cookies.
Learn more.

×

This website uses cookies. Some of the cookies we use are essential for parts of the website to operate while others offer you a better browsing experience. You give us your permission to use cookies, by continuing to use our website after you have received the cookie notification. To find out more about cookies on this website and how to change your cookie settings, see our Privacy policy and Terms of Use.

What You Need to Know About the New Coronavirus

What You Need to Know About the New Coronavirus

Thursday, March 12, 2020, 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

Read a summary of what was discussed at this webinar here and watch an archived recording of the webinar here.


The new coronavirus (COVID-19) is causing growing fear and confusion around the world. With conflicting information available from different sources, how do you know what’s real and what’s not? This 75 minute webinar will present the latest science-based information on the epidemic and answer practical questions about the virus.

In This Webinar, You'll Learn

  • What is the new coronavirus (COVID-19)?
  • What groups of people are most at risk from COVID-19 and why?
  • Are any treatments available? What new treatments are under development?
  • Will the spread of the disease stop with the end of “flu season”?
Michael T. Osterholm

Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH
University of Minnesota

Michael Osterholm is one of the nation’s foremost experts in public health, infectious disease and biosecurity. As the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, he is an international leader on the world’s preparedness for pandemics. He has led numerous investigations into internationally important disease outbreaks, including foodborne diseases, hepatitis B in health care settings, and HIV infection in healthcare workers, and he is a frequent consultant to the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Defense and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From 2001 to 2005, Dr. Osterholm served as a special advisor to the secretary of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on issues related to bioterrorism and public health preparedness. From June 2018 through May 2019, he served as a Science Envoy for Health Security on behalf of the US Department of State. He has also been appointed to the National Science Advisory Board on Biosecurity and the World Economic Forum’s Working Group on Pandemics, among other prominent advisory positions.

Julie Gerberding

Julie Gerberding, M.D., M.P.H.
Merck & Co.

Julie L. Gerberding is Executive Vice President and Chief Patient Officer, Strategic Communications, Global Public Policy, and Population Health Merck & Co. She joined Merck in January 2010 as president of Merck Vaccines and led efforts to make the company’s vaccines more available and affordable to people in resource-limited countries around the world. She left her tenured faculty position at the University of California, San Francisco in 1998 to lead the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion and then served as the CDC Director from 2002 to 2009. As director, she led the CDC through more than 40 emergency responses to public health crises, including anthrax bioterrorism, SARS, and natural disasters. She also advised governments around the world on urgent issues such as pandemic preparedness, AIDS, antimicrobial resistance, tobacco, and cancer. She has received more than 50 awards and honors, including the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Distinguished Service Award for her leadership in responses to anthrax bioterrorism and the September 11, 2001 attacks. She was named to Forbes Magazine's 100 Most Powerful Women in the World in 2005 through 2008 and to TIME Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World in 2004.

Access to Webinar Materials

A link to the eBriefing (video recording) of this Webinar will be available to all registrants within 30 days of the event date.  The eBriefing will be available to all registrants for 60 days following publication, after which it will revert to Member-only access. Not a Member? Join today.


Support the Academy

This free webinar and other programming is possible thanks to the generous support of our donors.  To make a donation, please click here.


Loading...