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Light Up Your Life with Glow-up Proteins

Light Up Your Life with Glow-up Proteins

Monday, January 18 - Friday, January 29, 2021 EST

Online Course

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

Light Up Your Life with Glow-up Proteins
Light Up Your Life with Glow-up Proteins

Lights, camera, action? Rather...lights, energy transfer, fluorescence! In this class we will discuss the world famous green fluorescent proteins (aka GFP) and its family of fluorescent proteins. The discovery and development of GFP radically changed scientific research, introducing a novel technology broadly used all around the world.

In this course, we will analyze the case of GFP to investigate the molecular nature of proteins and how they work. We will discern the fundamental principles that allow GFP to fluoresce and we study how structural changes affect its function/properties. By incorporating computational software to learn in silico techniques, we will embark on a journey to change the structure of this protein. In doing so, we can learn how the change in structure directly impacts the protein’s function from shining green to a range of other colors.

Finally, we will learn how to do this in the lab and why these techniques are important to apply these noble proteins to highlight different organelles or cell types. You will learn how this colorful protein has radically changed science, and you will be able to think of other applications for it.

$495/student for this two-week camp

Week 1: January 18-22

Week 2: January 25-29

Online via Zoom. Two hours of in-person teaching time with intermittent group breakout sections Monday through Friday. Students will be assigned work outside of class to be completed independently and in small groups.

Daily Monday through Friday, 4:00-6:00PM EST


Elena Cortes is a doctoral candidate in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics program at The University of Chicago. Her research focuses on how neural proteins can serve as therapeutics for receptor regulation to combat neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. Elena was awarded the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development funding entering her pre-doctoral program in 2017. In 2018, she was offered to partake in the Chemistry-Biology Interface program from the National Institute of Health. She was awarded the National Science Foundation-Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF GRFP) honorable mention in 2020. Elena did her undergraduate work at Calumet College of Saint Joseph in Biomedical Science, and worked for a year as a Post-Baccalaureate student researcher at the University of Pennsylvania. At UPenn, she studied how to combat neurodegenerative diseases by altering proteins we all already have inside our brains. Elena is currently Vice President for SACNAS and serves in the Graduate Council board for the diversity and inclusion team. Elena served as an instructor for high school and undergraduate students from Mexico through Clubes de Ciencia.

Jessica Morgan is a fourth-year graduate student in the Biophysical Sciences program at the University of Chicago. She is using silicon and carbon based nanomaterials to study peptide signaling in plants. She was awarded the NSF GRFP honorable mention 2019. Jessica did her undergraduate work at Smith College where she got a BA in biochemistry and her honors thesis utilized DNA origami to study nanoscale cargo transport by teams of molecular motor proteins. She is passionate about interdisciplinary science and basic research as well as outreach and mentorship. Jessica is currently one of the co-directors for the Graduate Recruitment Intaive Team at UChicago, the business operations manager for SACNAS at UChicago, and she is one of the co-founders for the Peer Mentoring group in her graduate program. Additionally, Jessica served as an instructor for high school and undergraduates students from Mexico through Clubes de Ciencia.

Objectives

  • Understand the various steps of the Central dogma of molecular biology.
  • Understand how manipulating the structure of a protein can alter its function.
  • Understand the basics of light microscopy and how fluorescent proteins have revolutionized the way we do science.

Outcomes

  • Students will have knowledge and ability to use ImageJ, Snapgene and PyMol
  • Students will have a firm grasp on protein structure, sequence alignments.
  • Students will learn how structural and dynamic studies can provide applicable insight into incorporating new protein functions.

Fluorescent proteins are a cutting edge technology, simple yet powerful tool that allows scientists to track proteins, by labeling them or tagging them. This technique revolutionized and keeps expanding our understanding of diverse areas such as development, neuroscience, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and more.

No. You will learn everything that you need to know in this workshop.

No the software we will be using you can access for free.

Yes, the homework we will assign will rely on having access to the internet.

We will try to have them recorded.

This means that we will meet for “in-person” lecture for 20 hours over the 2-week period and that we will assign 20 hours of self-directed and self-paced work outside of class.

Online sessions will meet weekdays, Monday to Friday from 4:00-6:00pm EST. Additionally, students can expect to spend between 5-10 hours outside of class on activities and projects.

Our STEM Camps are for high school students (grades 9-12) only.

The ideal student is self-motivated and eager to deepen their understanding of STEM-related subjects.

There are no prerequisites other than an interest in STEM-related subjects.

Select the camp that you are interested in and scroll down to register.

Payment is due immediately upon registration. The deadline to register is Wednesday January 13.

The two-week camp costs $495/student.

Unfortunately, discounts and scholarships are not available at this time. We hope that this is something we can offer need-based students in the future.

All registrations and payments are final and nonrefundable. Families are not able to reschedule or transfer into a different camp, once registered, so please consider course choices carefully. The Academy has the right to cancel the camp for any reason. If for any reason the Academy, cancels or postpones camp, registered participants will have the option to receive a refund or credit.

Students will earn a certificate from the Academy for successfully completing a STEM Camp.

The courses will be delivered via Zoom. A laptop or computer (Macs &amp PC’s both ok) with access to the Internet is required. In some cases, access to mobile devices will also be required. Additional software requirements vary by camp - please see individual STEM Camp details for more information.

If you are experiencing issues for any reason, you can contact customerservice@nyas.org.

You can share feedback directly with the instructor or by emailing camps@nyas.org. Families will also be invited to complete a survey at the conclusion of the program, to provide additional feedback.


Images and Documents

3 Papers (2009 Chalfie.pdf, 2009 Shimomura.pdf, & 2009 Tsien.pdf)

Stories from 2008 Nobel Laureates who revolutionized, discovered and built the GFP tools that are commonly used today.

Fluorescence Microscopy of live imaging shows how the GFP protein can be tagged to a protein of interest (POI) to detect how this POI localizes in different parts of a yeast cell. Here, we show how different mutations in our POI can influence our POI localization.

Fluorescence Microscopy of live imaging shows how the GFP protein can be tagged to a protein of interest (POI) to detect how this POI localizes in different parts of a yeast cell. Here, we show how different mutations in our POI can influence our POI localization. 

The structure of the green fluorescent protein (taken from PDB File: 1GFL) in its native form originating from species Aequorea victoria, or simply put, the jellyfish.

The structure of the green fluorescent protein (taken from PDB File: 1GFL) in its native form originating from species Aequorea victoria, or simply put, the jellyfish.

The structure of the green fluorescent protein (taken from PDB File: 1GFL), bottom view. Students will be able to analyze in depth these structures in softwares to see what amino acids are responsible for the color emission.

The structure of the green fluorescent protein (taken from PDB File: 1GFL), bottom view. Students will be able to analyze in depth these structures in softwares to see what amino acids are responsible for the color emission.

Registration

Individual
$495
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