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Targeted Protein Degradation: From Drug Discovery to the Clinic

Targeted Protein Degradation: From Drug Discovery to the Clinic

Tuesday, December 7, 2021, 8:30 AM - Wednesday, December 8, 2021, 5:00 PM EST

The New York Academy of Sciences
7 World Trade Center, New York City, USA

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

Biochemical Pharmacology Discussion Group

 

In the past several years, targeted protein degradation using proteolysis-targeting chimeras (PROTACs) has rapidly progressed from being useful as cellular tools for controlling protein levels to a method for generating in vivo efficacy against targets once thought to be undruggable.   Most recently, chimeric degraders have entered into clinical trials to treat prostate and breast tumors in humans. Additionally, new data on molecular glues, which are related degrader molecules, have raised the possibility that these systems can be utilized for therapeutic benefit.  Once thought to be the purview of genetic methods such as CRISPR and RNAi, it is now clear that protein levels can now be modulated in cells using optimization strategies similar to those used to optimize traditional small molecules.  This two-day symposium will cover the latest research in the field, highlighting topics such as clinical experience with PROTACs, developing PROTACs to target CNS disorders, small molecule protein degraders as a complimentary modality to chimeric PROTACs, and the exploration of novel E3 ligase space.

Registration for the event will open soon. Please check back shortly for more information, or follow us on social media for updates!

Speakers

Derek Bartlett, PhD

Pfizer

Yu Shen, PhD

AbbVie

Dan Nomura, PhD

University of California, Berkeley

Milka Kostic, PhD

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Yue Xiong, PhD

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Scientific Organizing Committee

Lynn Abell, PhD

Agioa

Matthew Calabrese, PhD

Pfizer

Adam Gilbert, PhD

Pfizer

Jian Jin, PhD

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Matthew Medeiros

Agios

Claire Steppan, PhD

Pfizer

Sara Donnelly, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences

Sonya Dougal, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences