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The Youth Vaping Epidemic: From Science to Public Policy

WEBINAR

Only

The Youth Vaping Epidemic: From Science to Public Policy

Wednesday, February 10, 2021, 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM EST

Webinar

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to capture public health official's attention, teenagers are still vaping in high numbers, putting their health at risk. This youth vaping epidemic highlights the urgent need to understand the science of nicotine addiction, in particular with regard to the developing brain, and the potential long term health effects of compounds found in vapes. This symposium will convene experts from academic, clinical, public health, and policy communities to discuss new approaches for prevention — with a focus on emerging science to support evidence-based policy recommendations.


There will be a virtual evening panel discussion titled, Vaping: Fact versus Fiction, on February 10, 2021. For more information and registration for the nighttime program, please visit: www.nyas.org/VapeFacts2021.

Registration

Member
$30
Nonmember Academia, Faculty, etc.
$65
Nonmember Corporate, Other
$85
Nonmember Not for Profit
$65
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
$45
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
$15

Scientific Organizing Committee

Brian King
Brian King, PhD, MPH

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Jennifer Layden
Jennifer Layden, MD, PhD

Illinois Department of Public Health

Alexandra Loukas
Alexandra Loukas, PhD

The University of Texas at Austin

Howard A. Zucker, MD, JD
Howard A. Zucker, MD, JD

New York State Department of Health

Sonya Dougal, PhD
Sonya Dougal, PhD

New York Academy of Sciences

Barbara Knappmeyer, PhD
Barbara Knappmeyer, PhD

New York Academy of Sciences

Speakers

Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, PhD
Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, PhD

Stanford University

Steven Kelder
Steven Kelder, PhD, MPH

University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin Campus​

Brian King
Brian King, PhD

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin, PhD
Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin, PhD

Yale School of Medicine

Jennifer Layden, MD, PhD
Jennifer Layden, MD, PhD

Illinois Department of Public Health

Frances Leslie, PhD
Frances Leslie, PhD

University of California, Irvine

Rachel Grana Mayne
Rachel Grana Mayne, PhD, MPH

National Cancer Institute

Matthew Myers, JD
Matthew Myers, JD

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Nancy A. Rigotti
Nancy A. Rigotti, MD

Havard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital

Donna Vallone, PhD, MPH
Donna Vallone, PhD, MPH

The Truth Initiative

Howard Zucker
Howard Zucker, MD, JD

Commissioner, New York State Department of Health

Event Sponsors

Wednesday

February 10, 2021

11:00 AM

Opening Remarks

Speaker

The New York Academy of Sciences
11:05 AM

Overview: The Rise of E-cigarettes - Implications for Public Health Practice

Speaker

Brian King, PhD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Considerable progress has been made reducing cigarette smoking among U.S. youth over the past two decades. However, the tobacco product landscape has diversified to include various combustible, non-combustible, and electronic products. In recent years, current e-cigarette use and the frequency of e-cigarette use among current users has dramatically increased among U.S. youth. This increase has erased past progress in reducing overall tobacco product use. In 2019, 27.5% of U.S. high school students and 10.5% of middle school students currently used e-cigarettes.

This presentation will set the stage for subsequent sessions during the conference by providing a broad overview of the issue of youth e-cigarettes use, including the evolution of e-cigarettes since their entry into the U.S. marketplace in 2007. The presentation will also discuss underlying drivers of youth use, as well as general variations in youth use across population groups, including school level, sex, and race/ethnicity. It will also describe the health implications associated with youth use of these products, including nicotine exposure during adolescence and young adulthood, harmful and potentially harmful ingredients documented in e-cigarette aerosol, and the potential for e-cigarettes to serve as a gateway to conventional cigarettes smoking. Finally, the presentation will discuss interventions that can be implemented at the national, state, and community levels to prevent and reduce youth e-cigarette use.

Session 1: Neuroscience of Nicotine Addiction and Health Effects of Vaping

Session Chairperson
Alexandra Loukas, PhD, The University of Texas at Austin
11:35 AM

Unique Effects of Nicotine on Adolescent Brain

Speaker

Frances Leslie, PhD
University of California, Irvine

Whereas the use of tobacco cigarettes has declined in the United States within recent years, the use of electronic cigarettes has increased exponentially. The perceptions of low health risk, combined with the appeal of flavors and minimal market regulations, have created a climate for the wide use of these products by teenagers. However, as highlighted in our pre-clinical studies, nicotine is a neurotoxicant that can produce unique and long-lasting negative effects in this age group. Nicotine mediates its effects via nicotinic cholinergic receptors, which are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that are widely distributed throughout the brain. Nicotinic receptors are expressed early in brain development and play critical maturational roles at many developmental stages, including adolescence. Since it is unethical to conduct experimental studies of nicotine effects on teenage brain, animal models are widely used. We have shown that nicotine has unique behavioral and biochemical effects in adolescent rats. Adolescents are more sensitive than adults to the rewarding effects of nicotine. Furthermore, nicotine exposure during early adolescence results in enhanced rewarding effects of other abused drugs, including cocaine, methamphetamine and alcohol. The neural mechanisms underlying this enhancement of drug reward will be discussed.

12:05 PM

Panel Discussion: Factors Driving the Youth Vaping Epidemic

Speakers

Moderator: Alexandra Loukas, PhD
The University of Texas at Austin
Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, PhD
Stanford University
Rachel Grana Mayne, PhD
National Cancer Institute
Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin, PhD
Yale School of Medicine
12:35 PM

Lunch Break

1:05 PM

EVALI and Lung Disease

Speaker

Jennifer Layden, MD, PhD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1:35 PM

Health Risks of Electronic Nicotine Delivering Systems for Youth

Speaker

Nancy Rigotti, MD
Havard Medical School
2:05 PM

Break

Session 2: Intervention Approaches

Session Chairperson
Brian King, PhD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
2:15 PM

Policy Overview: Different Approaches in Different States

Speaker

Matthew Myers, JD
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids
2:45 PM

New York State Policy Overview

Speaker

Howard Zucker,MD, JD
Commissioner, New York State Department of Health
3:15 PM

TBD

3:45 PM

Break

3:55 PM

Population-Based Interventions to Reduce E-cigarette Use Among Young People in the U.S.: Design, Implementation and Evaluation

Speaker

Donna Vallone, PhD
The Truth Initiative

The e-cigarette epidemic among young people evolved through a confluence of factors including a lack of e-cigarette policy and regulation and an aggressive, industry-sponsored media campaign aimed at young people.  To help address this epidemic, Truth Initiative employs a multi-level, population-based approach which is evidence-based, innovative, and iterative.  This presentation will focus on the development and implementation of two key population-based interventions: 1) the transition of the evidence-based truth® campaign to speak to young people about e-cigarette use, including a current innovative social influencer media effort to help normalize quitting; and 2) the first-ever digital and scalable quit vaping program, This Is Quitting (TIQ), to youth and young adults.

These interventions are monitored and evaluated using rapid and rigorous data collections, including the Truth Longitudinal Cohort (TLC), a bi-annual, nationally representative, probability sample of respondents aged 15-24; the Continuous Tracking Online (CTO), a weekly tracking survey of youth and young adults aged 15-24; a comprehensive library of Nielsen sales data for monitoring changes in consumer behavior; and a suite of social media monitoring and listening tools.  These data collection efforts have also provided critical information about the evolving epidemic which has complemented our national surveillance data. A comprehensive set of studies designed to test the efficacy and optimize our quit vaping program will also be described.

4:25 PM

School Policy – Challenges & Recommendations

Speaker

Steve Kelder, PhD
University of Texas School of Public Health, Austin Campus​
4:55 PM

Closing Remarks

5:00 PM

Adjourn