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Genome Integrity Discussion Group October 2021

WEBINAR

Only

Genome Integrity Discussion Group October 2021

Monday, October 18, 2021

Webinar

Presented By

Genome Integrity Discussion Group

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

The greater New York metropolitan area is unparalleled in the concentration of world leading research on chromosome biology and function, as well as for research at the interface between chromosome integrity and the dynamics of malignancy. The Genome Integrity Discussion Group capitalizes on this concentration of excellence, providing a forum for interaction between basic- and clinically-oriented research groups working in these fields. These meetings facilitate synergy between labs, and provide a context in which previously unappreciated complementarities can be revealed.

In that spirit, the talks cover a broad range of areas including the DNA damage response and cancer predisposition, DNA replication, transcription, chromatin modification, recombination, cell cycle control, telomeres, chromosome segregation, epigenetic states, as well as the emergence of new technologies relevant to research in genome integrity. Although a primary focus is upon basic mechanisms and processes, these areas are pertinent to cancer and myriad human disease states.

Registration

Member
$5
Nonmember Academia, Faculty, etc.
$30
Nonmember Corporate, Other
$45
Nonmember Not for Profit
$30
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
$10
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
$0

Speakers

Juan Castaneda
Juan Castaneda

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center / Weill Cornell Graduate School

Sevinc Ercan, PhD
Sevinc Ercan, PhD

New York University

Tony Huang, PhD
Tony Huang, PhD

New York University School of Medicine

Marcin Imielinski, MD, PhD
Marcin Imielinski, MD, PhD

Weill Cornell Medicine

Rodney Rothstein, PhD
Rodney Rothstein, PhD

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Jennifer Zagelbaum
Jennifer Zagelbaum

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Scientific Organizing Committee

Scott Keeney, PhD
Scott Keeney, PhD

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Jean Gautier, PhD
Jean Gautier, PhD

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Susan Smith, PhD
Susan Smith, PhD

New York University Langone Medical Center

Agata Smogorzewska, MD, PhD
Agata Smogorzewska, MD, PhD

The Rockefeller University

Alison Carley, PhD
Alison Carley, PhD

New York Academy of Sciences

Program Supporters

Monday

October 18, 2021

1:30 PM

Welcome Remarks

1:40 PM

Topoisomerases I and II Promote Condensin DC Translocation on DNA

Speaker

Sevinc Ercan, PhD
New York University
2:10 PM

Adventures in Double-strand Break Repair

Speaker

Rodney Rothstein, PhD
Columbia University Irving Medical Center
2:40 PM

Mechanism of Loading and Release of the 9-1-1 Checkpoint Clamp by Rad-24 RFC​

Speaker

Juan Castaneda
Weill Cornell Medicine

5’ single-stranded/double-stranded DNA junctions are critical for the induction of DNA damage and replication checkpoints by serving as loading sites for the checkpoint clamp, 9-1-1, which mediates the activation of the apical checkpoint kinase, ATRMec1. However, the basis for 9-1-1’s recruitment to 5’ junctions is unclear. Here, we present structures of the yeast checkpoint clamp loader, Rad24-RFC, in complex with 9-1-1 and a 5’ junction as well as a structure of Rad24-RFC in a post-ATP-hydrolysis state. Unexpectedly, 9-1-1 adopts two states in the presence of the loader and DNA, a closed state and an open state in which the ring dilates ~30 Å in a planar fashion. Moreover, Rad24-RFC associates with the junction in the opposite orientation of processivity clamp loaders. Rad24 exclusively recognizes and coordinates the double-stranded region of the DNA, including the 5’ junction, while single-stranded DNA passes into the interior clamp loader chamber. Consequently, contrary to processivity clamps, 9-1-1 is loaded around single-stranded DNA. Upon ATP hydrolysis, Rad24-RFC undergoes large conformational changes that would lead to disengagement of the DNA-loaded 9-1-1 from Rad24-RFC. Together, these structures explain the specific loading of 9-1-1 at 5’ junctions and reveal new principles of the sliding clamp loading mechanism.

2:55 PM

Break

3:10 PM

ARP2/3- and Resection-coupled Genome Reorganization Facilitates Translocations

Speaker

Jennifer Zagelbaum
Columbia University Irving Medical Center
3:25 PM

Pathognomonic Long Molecule Footprints of Homologous Recombination Deficiency

Speaker

Marcin Imielinski, MD, PhD
Weill Cornell Medicine
3:55 PM

Role of the USP1 Deubiquitinase in Mediating Replication Stress

Speaker

Tony Huang, PhD
New York University School of Medicine
4:25 PM

Q&A with all speakers

4:55 PM

Adjourn

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