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Genomic Repeats Link Cancer and Neurodegeneration

WEBINAR

Only

Genomic Repeats Link Cancer and Neurodegeneration

Tuesday, April 13, 2021, 10:30 AM - 5:30 PM EDT

Webinar

Presented By

The Biochemical Pharmacology Discussion Group

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

Repetitive sequences (RS) comprise over two-thirds of the human genome. There are two types. In tandem repeats, such as triplet and tetranucleotide microsatellite RS, multiple copies of a short DNA sequence occur adjacent to each other. In dispersed repeats, such as transposable elements, the copies are not clustered, but are widely distributed throughout the genome. Both types of RS cause genomic instability, a feature common to two very different disease classes, cancer and neurodegeneration. Desilencing of dispersed RS causes neurological dysfunction, including death of post-mitotic cells. In cancer, deregulation of dispersed RS contributes to tumorigenesis, potentially providing an opportunity to selectively target tumor cells therapeutically. Mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins are associated with colorectal cancer. However, in neurodegenerative disease, MMR mutations slow the somatic expansion of tandem RS and delay age of onset.

This symposium will examine both the role of repetitive sequences in the etiology of cancer and neurodegeneration as well as the DNA damage response and repair pathways that modulate the pathogenesis of repetitive sequences.

Registration

Member
$30
Nonmember Academia, Faculty, etc.
$65
Nonmember Corporate, Other
$85
Nonmember Not for Profit
$65
Nonmember Student, Undergrad, Grad, Fellow
$45
Member Student, Post-Doc, Fellow
$15

Keynote Speaker

Vanessa Wheeler, PhD
Vanessa Wheeler, PhD

Massachusetts General Hospital

Speakers

Kathleen H. Burns, MD, PhD

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Daniel De Carvalho, PhD

University of Toronto

Farid A. Kadyrov, PhD

Southern Illinois University

Eunjung (Alice) Lee, PhD

Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Päivi Peltomäki, MD, PhD

University of Helsinki

Jennifer Phillips‐Cremins, PhD

University of Pennsylvania

Karen Usdin, PhD

National Institutes of Health

Scientific Organizing Committee

Christine Bulawa, PhD

Pfizer

Daniel De Carvalho, PhD

University of Toronto

Amrutha Pattamata, PhD

Pfizer

Vanessa Wheeler, PhD

Massachusetts General Hospital

Paul Wes, PhD

Pfizer

Alison Carley, PhD

New York Academy of Sciences

Tuesday

April 13, 2021

10:30 AM

Introduction and Welcome Remarks

Speakers

Christine Bulawa
Pfizer Rare Disease Research Unit
Alison Carley, PhD
New York Academy of Sciences
10:45 AM

Keynote Address: Genetic modifiers of Huntington disease

Speaker

Vanessa Wheeler, PhD
Massachusetts General Hospital
11:30 AM

Lynch Syndrome

Speaker

Päivi Peltomäki, MD, PhD
University of Helsinki
12:00 PM

Break

12:15 PM

Human MutLγ, the MLH1–MLH3 Heterodimer, is an Endonuclease That Promotes DNA Expansion

Speaker

Farid A. Kadyrov, PhD
Southern Illinois University
12:45 PM

A New Potential Target for Modulating Somatic Instability Identified in a Mouse Model of the Fragile X-related Disorders

Speaker

Karen Usdin, PhD
National Institutes of Health
1:15 PM

Short Talks

2:00 PM

Lunch

2:45 PM

Deregulation of Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 Retrotransposons in Cancer

Speaker

Kathleen H. Burns, MD, PhD
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
3:15 PM

3D Epigenome Reconfiguration in Brain Development and Repeat Expansion Disorders

3:45 PM

The Role of Retrotransposons in Human Health and Disease

Speaker

Eunjung Lee, PhD
Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School
4:15 PM

Break

4:30 PM

To Be Announced

5:00 PM

Therapeutic Approach to Retrotransposons in Cancer

Speaker

Daniel De Carvalho, PhD
University of Toronto
5:30 PM

Adjourn