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RNA Viruses and the Immune System

WEBINAR

Only

FREE

for Members

RNA Viruses and the Immune System

Thursday, February 25, 2021, 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM EST

Webinar

Presented By

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an urgency to fully understand how RNA viruses work and how the immune system fights them. This 75-minute webinar will explore how various organisms have evolved to fight RNA viruses, how cells detect RNA viruses, and how to track antiviral responses in real time.

In This Webinar, You'll Learn

  • How have organisms fought RNA viruses throughout evolutionary history;
  • How do cells detect the presence of RNA viruses;
  • How do non-immune cells alert the body of infection;
  • How are small RNAs used to fight RNA viruses;
  • How do you track the antiviral response in real time?

Benjamin tenOever

Benjamin tenOever, PhD
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Benjamin tenOever, PhD, is interested in the evolution of viral defense systems. His research on how different cellular virus-host interactions advances our understanding of basic biological processes in order to expand the molecular toolbox and create new innovations. Dr. tenOever is a Fishberg Professor of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He received is BSc and PhD at McGill University and joined Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in 2007.

Sun Hur

Sun Hur, PhD
Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Sun Hur, PhD, centers her research on the molecular mechanisms of self and non-self discrimination by the immune system, particularly how they are involved in antiviral immune responses and T-cell development of self-tolerance. Dr. Hur is an Oscar M. Schloss Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. She received her BSc at Ewha Womans University and PhD at University of California, Santa Barbara. She joined Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 2008.

Registration

Member
$0
Nonmember
$10

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