Disease Drivers of Aging: 2016 Advances in Geroscience Summit

Disease Drivers of Aging: 2016 Advances in Geroscience Summit

Wednesday, April 13, 2016 - Thursday, April 14, 2016

The New York Academy of Sciences

Presented By

The Gerontological Society of America

American Federation for Aging Research

The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group

The New York Academy of Sciences

 

Cellular and organismal decline with aging has been shown to promote chronic disease pathology, however insufficient research has focused on the inverse relationship, i.e., how chronic diseases and associated therapies can accelerate the onset of age-related changes. In October 2013, the National Institutes of Health hosted the groundbreaking event, Advances in Geroscience: Impact on Healthspan and Chronic Disease, a highly successful convening developed by the Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG). This event was designed to explore how aging contributes to chronic disease pathology and progression, but it also highlighted the pressing need for further research on the impact of chronic diseases on the molecular pillars of aging.

To address this unmet need and to gather the community for a follow-up meeting, the New York Academy of Sciences, together with the NIH Geroscience Interest Group, the Gerontological Society of America and the American Federation for Aging Research will present the 1.5-day Disease Drivers of Aging: 2016 Advances in Geroscience Summit on April 13–14, 2016, in New York City. This landmark event will convene basic, translational, and clinical researchers from academic institutions, pharmaceutical companies, government agencies, and non-profit organizations, who work in the disparate fields of HIV/AIDS, oncology, diabetes, and aging research in an effort to better understand the complex relationship between chronic diseases and age-associated decline. Conference Sessions will combine basic, translational, and clinical researchers and will feature a unique format of short, focused talks centered on critical open research questions, along with interactive panel discussions. Speakers will explore the impact of chronic diseases (e.g., HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and cancer) and their associated therapies on rates of cellular and organismal aging in an attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which chronic diseases and treatments can accelerate age-related health decline. Participants will identify knowledge gaps and future directions of research required for a more complete understanding of the relationship between chronic diseases and aging.

Registration Pricing

  By 03/01/2016 After 03/01/2016 Onsite
Member $100 $150 $200
Member (Student / Postdoc / Resident / Fellow) $75 $100 $150
Nonmember (Academia) $175 $225 $300
Nonmember (Corporate) $225 $275 $350
Nonmember (Non-profit) $175 $225 $300
Nonmember (Student / Postdoc / Fellow) $100 $125 $175

 

Agenda

* Presentation titles and times are subject to change.


Day 1: Wednesday, April 13, 2016

8:00 AM

Breakfast, Registration, and Poster Set-Up

8:30 AM

Opening Remarks
Ellis Rubinstein, The New York Academy of Sciences
Stephanie Lederman, EdM, American Federation for Aging Research
Ronald Kohanski, PhD, National Institute on Aging (NIA) and Geroscience Interest Group National Institutes of Health (NIH)
James Appleby, The Gerontological Society of America
Brooke Grindlinger, PhD, The New York Academy of Sciences

Session I. Keynote Presentations

Chairperson: Ronald Kohanski, PhD, National Institutes on Aging (NIA) and Geroscience Interest Group; National Institutes of Health (NIH)

8:50 AM

Geroscience as a Multidisciplinary Approach to Understanding Aging
Richard Hodes, MD, National Institute on Aging (NIA); National Institutes of Health (NIH)

9:20 AM

Disease Drivers of Aging as a Topic of Geroscience
Felipe Sierra, PhD, National Institute on Aging (NIA); National Institutes of Health (NIH)

9:35 AM

The Geroscience Hypothesis: What Do We Know?
Steven Austad, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham

10:05 AM

Physiological Stress, Chronic Diseases, and Telomere Length
Elissa Epel, PhD, University of California, San Francisco

10:35 AM

Coffee Break

Session II. Aging with HIV: Responding to an Emerging Challenge

11:05 AM

Introduction
Chairperson: Kevin High, MD, Wake Forest University
Vice-Chairperson: Steven Deeks, MD, AIDS Research Institute; University of California, San Francisco

11:15 AM

Acceleration of Immune Senescence by a Chronic Viral Infection (HIV and CMV)
Beth Jamieson, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles

11:25 AM

How is Cognitive Function Affected by Chronic HIV Infection?
James Becker, PhD, University of Pittsburgh

11:35 AM

The Bidirectional Relationship between Stress and HIV
Gretchen Neigh, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University

11:45 AM

How are Women’s Health Issues and/or Hormonal Influences Affected by HIV?
Kathryn Anastos, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

11:55 AM

Gut Barrier, Microbiome, and Health in HIV and Aging
Peter Hunt, MD, University of California, San Francisco

12:05 PM

From Wasting to Obesity: HIV and its Therapy in Aging
Kristine Erlandson, MD, University of Colorado

12:15 PM

Moderated Panel Discussion
Panel comprised of Session Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson, and Plenary Speakers

12:50 PM

Networking Lunch

Early Career Investigator and Underrepresented Minority Mentoring Lunch

Session III. Emerging Science: Hot Topic Talks

Chairperson: Ronald Kohanski, PhD, National Institutes on Aging (NIA) and Geroscience Interest Group; National Institutes of Health (NIH)

1:45 PM

Comorbidity Trajectories among Cancer Survivors: A Potential Example of Premature Aging
Corinne Leach, PhD, MPH, American Cancer Society

2:05 PM

GDF11 is a Biomarker of Frailty, Comorbidity, and Adverse Surgical Health Outcomes in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease
Marissa Schafer, PhD, Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine

2:25 PM

Mitochondrial Dysfunction-associated Senescence as a Promoter of Lipoatrophy in Response to Antiretroviral Therapy
Christopher Wiley, PhD, Buck Institute for Research on Aging

2:45 PM

DNA Methylation Age Is Accelerated Prior to AIDS-NHL Diagnosis
Mary Sehl, MD, PhD, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles

3:05 PM

Coffee Break

Session IV. Examining the Impacts of Diabetes on Aging

3:45 PM

Introduction
Chairperson: Nir Barzilai, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Vice-Chairperson: Jeffrey Halter, MD, University of Michigan

3:55 PM

How Does Diabetes and Aberrant Insulin Signaling Accelerate the Effects of Aging in the Brain and Neurovascular System?
C. Ronald Kahn, MD, Joslin Diabetes Center

4:05 PM

The Calpain System in Aging
Rosario Scalia, MD, PhD, Temple University

4:15 PM

How Does Diabetes Affect the Seven Pillars of Aging in the Kidneys?
Balakuntalam Kasinath, MD, Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies; University of Texas Health Science Center

4:25 PM

How Does Diabetes Affect Functional Mobility?
Caroline Blaum, MD, New York University

4:35 PM

Does Diabetes Accelerate Aging of Beta Cells through Hyperglycemia (Glucose Toxicity) and Also Insulin Resistance?
Jeffrey Halter, MD, University of Michigan

4:45 PM

Moderated Panel Discussion
Panel comprised of Session Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson, and Plenary Speakers

5:30 PM

Poster Session and Networking Reception

6:45 PM

Conclusion of Day 1

Day 2: Thursday, April 14, 2016

8:00 AM

Breakfast

8:15 AM

Early Career Investigator Mentoring Workshop (concurrent)
For Graduate Students, Post-doctoral Fellows, and Junior Faculty

Editor's Guide to Writing and Publishing Your Paper
Brooke Grindlinger, PhD, The New York Academy of Sciences
Former Editor, Journal of Clinical Investigation

Session V. Understanding and Mitigating Premature Aging Due To Cancer and Chemotherapy

9:00 AM

Introduction
Chairperson: Arti Hurria, MD, City of Hope National Medical Center
Vice-Chairperson: Claudia Gravekamp, PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

9:10 AM

How Senescent Cells Contribute to Aging and Disease
Jan van Deursen, PhD, Mayo Clinic

9:20 AM

How Does Activation of Inflammatory and Coagulation Pathways in Cancer Patients Affect Survivorship and Functional Status?
Harvey J. Cohen, MD, Duke University

9:30 AM

Which Animal and/or Cellular Models are Best for Studying the Effects of Cancer and Cancer Therapy on the Aging Process?
Judith Campisi, PhD, Buck Institute for Research on Aging

9:40 AM

Functional Decline In the Older Cancer Patient...Can Lifestyle Interventions Turn Back the Hands of Time?
Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham

9:50 AM

How Does Cancer and/or Cancer Treatment Impact Cognitive Aging?
Timothy Ahles, PhD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

10:00 PM

Moderated Panel Discussion
Panel comprised of Session Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson, and Plenary Speakers

10:45 AM

Coffee Break

Session VI. Identifying Common Themes and Open Research Questions to Advance Therapies for Chronic Diseases and Aging

Moderator:   Felipe Sierra, PhD, National Institute on Aging (NIA); National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Panelists:   Kevin High, MD, Wake Forest University
Nir Barzilai, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Jeffrey Halter, MD, University of Michigan
Peter Hunt, MD, University of California, San Francisco
Arti Hurria, MD, City of Hope National Medical Center
Claudia Gravekamp, PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

11:15 AM

What are the Common Themes/Threads That Have Emerged in the Areas of HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, and Cancer as They Pertain to the Biology of Aging?

11:45 AM

What Are the Open Research Questions That Need to Be Addressed to Advance Our Understanding of How HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, and Cancer Impact the Aging Process?

12:15 PM

If Chronic Diseases Are Accelerating Aging, How Will That Impact Disease Follow-Up and/or Aging Treatments?

12:45 PM

Networking Lunch

1:45 PM

Conference Concludes

 

 

Organizers

Siobhan Addie, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences

James Appleby, RPh, MPH

The Gerontological Society of America
website

Steven Austad, PhD

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Rita Effros, PhD

University of California, Los Angeles
website

Rebecca Fuldner, PhD

National Institute on Aging; National Institutes of Health

Paige Green, PhD, MPH

National Cancer Institute; National Institutes of Health
website

Brooke Grindlinger, PhD

The New York Academy of Sciences

Robin Huebner, PhD, MPH

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institutes of Health

Ronald Kohanski, PhD

National Institute on Aging; National Institutes of Health

Stephanie Lederman, EdM

American Federation for Aging Research
website

Kevin J. Lee, PhD

The Lawrence Ellison Foundation; American Federation for Aging Research

Judie Lieu

The Gerontological Society of America

Francesca Macchiarini, PhD

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Institutes of Health

Susan McCarthy, PhD

National Cancer Institute; National Institutes of Health
website

Aaron Pawlyk, PhD

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; National Institutes of Health
website

Felipe Sierra, PhD

National Institute on Aging; National Institutes of Health
website

Luke Stoeckel, PhD

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; National Institutes of Health
website

Odette van der Willik

American Federation for Aging Research
website

Speakers

Timothy Ahles, MD

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Kathryn Anastos, MD

Albert Einstein College of Medicine
website

Nir Barzilai, MD

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

James Becker, PhD

University of Pittsburgh

Caroline Blaum, MD

New York University
website

Judith Campisi, PhD

Buck Institute for Research on Aging
website

Harvey J. Cohen, MD

Duke University
website

Steven Deeks, MD

AIDS Research Institute; University of California, San Francisco

Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, MD

University of Alabama at Birmingham
website

Elissa Epel, MD

University of California, San Francisco
website

Kristine Erlandson, MD

University of Colorado

Claudia Gravekamp, PhD

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Jeffrey Halter, MD

University of Michigan

Kevin High, MD

Wake Forest University
website

Richard Hodes, MD

National Institute on Aging (NIA); National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Peter Hunt, MD

University of California, San Francisco
website

Arti Hurria, MD

City of Hope National Medical Center
website

Beth Jamieson, PhD

University of California, Los Angeles

C. Ronald Kahn, PhD

Joslin Diabetes Center

Balakuntalam Kasinath, MD

Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies; University of Texas Health Science Center

Gretchen Neigh, PhD

Virginia Commonwealth University

Rosario Scalia, MD, PhD

Temple University
website

Jan van Deursen, PhD

Mayo Clinic
website

Sponsors

For sponsorship opportunities please contact Melanie Brickman Stynes, PhD, at mbrickman@nyas.org or 212.298.8655.

Silver Sponsor

Academy Friends

Alliance for Aging Research

American Federation for Aging Research

American Geriatrics Society

The Gerontological Society of America

Novartis

 

Grant Support

Funding for this conference was made possible, in part, by 1 R13 AG 053043-01 from the National Institute on Aging. Co-funding has been provided by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and the National Cancer Institute. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Lilly. For further information concerning Lilly grant funding visit www.lillygrantoffice.com

Gilead Sciences, Inc.

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

 

Promotional Partners

Ageing Research Reviews

Buck Institute for Research on Aging

Cancer and Aging Research Group

Columbia Diabetes Research Center

Experimental Gerontology

Journal of Geriatric Oncology

Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

Nature Cell Biology

NPJ Aging and Mechanisms of Disease

SENS Research Foundation

 

Presented by

  • The Gerontological Society of America

Travel & Lodging

Special Needs and Additional Information

For any additional information and for special needs, including child/family care resources available to conference attendees, please e-mail jcurtin@nyas.org or call 212.298.8694.

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