Academy Member and Speaker Siddhartha Mukherjee Awarded 2011 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-fiction

Nicholas Carr, also an Academy member and speaker in the Science & the City series, was named as a finalist for the same award.

Published April 19, 2011

Yesterday, it was announced that Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD, cancer physician, researcher, and author, has been awarded the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Non-fiction for The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer. Also named one of the "10 Best Books of 2010" by the New York Times, The Emperor of All Maladies is a magnificent, profoundly humane "biography" of cancer—from its first documented appearances thousands of years ago through the epic battles in the 20th century to cure, control, and conquer it to a radical new understanding of its essence.

Dr. Murkerjee is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences Academy, where he spoke about his book on April 14, 2011 at the Science & the City event, "A Biography of Cancer: An Evening with Siddharta Mukherjee."

Nicholas Carr's The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains, was also nominated for the Pulitzer. Combining insights from philosophy, science, and history, the book explores how the culture of the Web is changing, and in some cases dumbing down, our minds.

Carr gave a talk at the Academy on Novemeber 9, 2010 as part of Science & the City's History of Science series: "From Stone Tools to the Internet: How Humans Adapt to Technology."

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About the authors:
Dr. Mukherjee is an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University and a staff cancer physician at Columbia University Medical Center. A Rhodes scholar, he graduated from Stanford University, University of Oxford, Harvard Medical School. He has published articles in Nature, The New England Journal of Medicine, The New York Times, and The New Republic. He lives in New York with his wife and daughters.

Carr is an award winning journalist and author. He is a member of the Encyclopedia Britannica's editorial board of advisors, is on the steering board of the World Economic Forum's cloud computing project, and writes the popular blog Rough Type. He holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and an M.A., in English and American Literature and Language, from Harvard University.