The Many Shades of Outreach

Learn how everything from STEM mentoring to a science-themed social gathering could not only make you feel good about your work, but also give you a professional boost.

Published June 21, 2016

The Many Shades of Outreach

What makes a great scientist? While hard work and great advisers can play crucial roles in creating great scientists, an often overlooked piece of the equation is communication, or outreach, skills. Being able to share your work and help others understand why it's valuable are part of what make scientists inspiring and successful.

Some people think that communication is an innate skill or that it has to take the form of writing compelling articles, but what many young scientists don't realize is that communication and outreach skills can come in a variety of forms and can be learned. And these communication skills don't just help scientists reach a wider audience, it's clear that they also lead to professional advantages.

Read our recent eBriefing, "Developing Scientists through Outreach," to learn more about how scientists are putting an array of outreach skills, from mentoring to science-themed social gatherings, to use in ways that are helping others as well as the scientists themselves.

And watch this video with Emily Rice, PhD, an outreach superstar who engages in a wide array of outreach efforts that she believes are not only making her a better scientist, but also helping to change the face of STEM.


If you're looking to develop your outreach and communication skills, one of the most effective ways to do it is through mentoring young students interested in STEM subjects. Apply now to join one of our in-person or virtual STEM mentoring programs.