Updating Med Ed

What changes are needed to make medical school curriculum more appropriate for the current healthcare environment?

Published March 08, 2013

Updating Med Ed

Medical educators have a tough job: teach students everything they need to know to be successful practitioners, even as the information they teach, and the world around us, changes at a rapid pace. While medical schools attempt to teach their students the most up-to-date medical information available, many feel that the curriculum (and even the basic structure of medical school) is not changing quickly enough to keep pace with changes just about every other aspect of human life: technology, social structures, research findings, and more. Check out the following Academy resources to see what changes to medical education are being recommended by experts, and possibly coming to a medical school near you.

Health 2.0: Digital Technology in Clinical Care
Event & Podcast

Health 2.0: Digital Technology in Clinical Care

At this conference and interactive simulcast webinar on Friday, March 22, learn how digital technologies—including mobile apps, wearable sensors, robotics, remote learning, and portable diagnostic devices—are becoming an integral part of clinical care and medical education. In-person attendees will be eligible for CME credits. For a special preview of conference topics, listen to a podcast on digital healthcare technology: virtual patients, AI doctors, and more.

Innovating and Updating the Medical School Curriculum
eBriefing

Innovating and Updating the Medical School Curriculum

Read this eBriefing based on the inaugural event of the Academy's Translational Medicine Initiative, in which representatives from several medical schools advocate for critical updates to physician training, motivated by advances in science and technology.

Prioritizing Health Disparities in Medical Education to Improve Care
eBriefing

Prioritizing Health Disparities in Medical Education to Improve Care

Learn how medical schools can reduce health disparities—differences in health outcomes between groups that often reflect social inequalities—and promote health equality, regardless of education level, race, sexual orientation, geographic location, and other factors.

Capacity Building in Nutrition Sciences: Revisiting the Curricula for Medical Professionals
Event

Capacity Building in Nutrition Sciences: Revisiting the Curricula for Medical Professionals

Join the Academy at this conference on Thursday, June 6, to learn the importance of teaching would-be doctors about nutrition science, including the differences between micro- and macro-nutrients, how they interact with your body, and how this information might be used to help prevent, diagnose, or treat disease.

Integrating Student Research into the Medical School Curriculum
eBriefing

Integrating Student Research into the Medical School Curriculum

Educators say that undertaking basic research can help medical school students sharpen the analytical, creative, and critical-thinking skills that the practice of medicine demands. Should immersion in a research experience should be a core component of medical training for all medical students, no matter specialty they plan to pursue?


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The New York Academy of Sciences is an independent, not-for-profit organization that since 1817 has been committed to advancing science, technology, and society worldwide. With 25,000 members in 140 countries, the Academy is creating a global community of science for the benefit of humanity. The Academy's core mission is to advance scientific knowledge, positively impact the major global challenges of society with science-based solutions, and increase the number of scientifically informed individuals in society at large. Please visit us online at www.nyas.org.