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Where Physics and Philosophy Intersect

June 23, 2016

Where Physics and Philosophy Intersect
Listen in to a discussion with writer Jim Holt, philosophers David Z. Albert and Hans Halvorson, and science writer Kate Becker about the realms where physics and philosophy intersect.

For centuries, physics and philosophy walked side by side in pursuit of their shared goal—understanding the nature of reality. The progress of science has pushed the frontier of physics into the realm of advanced mathematics, which requires technical skill and levels of abstraction attainable only after years of dedicated training. At the same time, most physicists today do not receive training in philosophy and epistemology, few have the time to ponder philosophical implications of their work, and some even doubt the possibility of a meaningful dialog between physicists and philosophers. However, at its core, physics addresses the fundamental problems that shape our philosophical outlook. This podcast features audio from our second Physics of Everything event.
 
This podcast was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the speaker(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the John Templeton Foundation.