GAP and IMI to Sign MOU to Accelerate Alzheimer's Drug Development

GAP, initiated by the New York Academy of Sciences and Global CEO Initiative, moving one step closer to reaching its goal of establishing a global, trial-ready platform for Alzheimer's disease.

March 19, 2015 —The Global Alzheimer's Platform (GAP) and the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) announced today that they will sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to accelerate Alzheimer's drug development by building a global, standing, trial-ready platform for Alzheimer's drug development. The collaboration represents a significant commitment to work together to recruit patients for clinical trials, to create a high-performing clinical trial system, and to develop a standing adaptive protocol to test new molecules quickly, and move those with promise into later stage development. 

"This agreement represents an important commitment from major initiatives in Europe and the United States to expand and improve our capacity to conduct trials in Alzheimer's in order to bring innovative medicines to patients faster," said George Vradenburg, convener of the Global CEO Initiative on Alzheimer's Disease, co-founder of USAgainstAlzheimer's, and a member of the World Dementia Council. "Through our collaborative efforts here in the U.S., organized through GAP, and with these consortia in Europe, we believe we can begin to design a truly global clinical trial system of speed, power, and efficiency. No one company or one government can do this alone. We must have a global commitment and it must come from government, industry, and academia and be driven by the passion and urgency of the patient community." 

Currently, there is no global pool of persons with or at risk of Alzheimer's who are standing ready, able, and willing to participate in clinical trials of promising innovative Alzheimer's medicines. The challenge of recruiting into the range of trials underway today and in the future stands as one of the single greatest barriers to increasing the pace of drug development in Alzheimer's. This problem is further compounded by the fact that each new Alzheimer's trial must start the process of participant recruitment and trial site preparation anew, with the consequence that lessons are lost, participant experience is wasted, and investments are repeated, costing individuals and industry precious time. 

www.nyas.org/ADDI to learn more.