What to Eat? Author and NYU Professor Marion Nestle Explains How Food Marketers Distort Science for Sales

The former senior nutrition policy adviser in the Department of Health and Human Services contends that the giants of agribusiness compete for your purchases with profits—not health or nutrition—in mind.

 

The second event of the Girls Night Out at the New York Academy of Sciences public lecture series will feature public health and nutrition expert Marion Nestle. An NYU professor and former senior nutrition policy advisor in the Department of Health and Human Services, Nestle contends that the modern grocery store is a place where the giants of agribusiness compete for your purchases with profits—not health or nutrition—in mind. Nestle has taught millions to decode food labels, nutrition and health claims, and portion sizes, and make decisions about food on the basis of freshness, taste, nutrition, and health, as well as social and environmental issues and price. The event is hosted by the Academy's public outreach program, Science & the City.

WHO: Speaker:
Marion Nestle, PhD, MPH, Paulette Goddard Professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University, and author of three prize-winning books: Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health, Safe Food: Bacteria, Biotechnology, and Bioterrorism, and What to Eat.

WHEN: Tuesday, February 16, 2010 | 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Reception and book signing will follow.

WHERE: The New York Academy of Sciences
7 World Trade Center, 250 Greenwich St., 40th floor

Register and see speaker biographies at http://www.nyas.org/girlsnightout.

The New York Academy of Sciences is an independent, not-for-profit organization committed to advancing science, technology, and society worldwide since 1817. With 24,000 members in 140 countries, NYAS is creating a global community of science for the benefit of humanity. NYAS' core mission is to advance scientific knowledge, positively impact the major global challenges of society with science-based solutions, and increase the number of scientifically informed individuals in society at large.