Comments*

 
  • Academy Events

  • Understanding Somatosensation and Pain: The 2013 Dr. Paul Janssen Award Symposium

    Thursday, September 19, 2013 | 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    The New York Public Library, South Court Auditorium

    Presented by the Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research and the New York Academy of Sciences

    Related Content

    The scientific breakthroughs of Dr. David Julius, PhD, have greatly advanced our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of touch, pain, and thermosensation. His research has led to an understanding of pain hypersensitivity, and how neurons sense stimuli and transmit signals to the brain. In 1997, Dr. Julius published a groundbreaking study in which his group identified and cloned the transient receptor potential (TRPV1) ion channel based on its activation by capsaicin from chili peppers as well as by excessive heat, explaining the burning hot sensation caused by skin contact with capsaicin. Dr. Julius identified additional ion channels on sensory nerves using other natural agents, including menthol from mint leaves and tarantula toxins, as pharmacological probes. In recognition for his role in discovering a unifying mechanism for nociception and thermosensation, Dr. Julius will receive the 2013 Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research.

    This symposium will honor Dr. Julius, who will reflect on his early discoveries and ongoing research to better understand thermosensation and how this mechanism contributes to the perception of acute, chronic, and inflammatory pain. Following the Award lecture, leading scientists in the somatosensory field will discuss new insights on the biology of pain and translational research that may lead to new therapies for chronic pain and inflammatory syndromes.

    Featuring

    David Julius, PhD

    University of California, San Francisco

    Registration Pricing

    Symposium registration is free. Although on-site registration may be possible on the day of the event, pre-registration is highly encouraged due to space limitations.

    This symposium is made possible with support from

    • Janssen Award
    • Johnson & Johnson
    EmailPrint