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  • Fourth Annual Symposium on Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis and Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Fourth Annual Symposium on Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis and Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents

    Organizers: Ali K. Abu-Alfa (Yale School of Medicine) and Shawn Cowper (Yale School of Medicine)Presented by the Yale School of Medicine and the New York Academy of Sciences
    Reported by Megan Stephan, PhD | Posted September 13, 2010

    Overview

    To get the best possible images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), radiologists rely on compounds known as contrast agents, which enhance the signal and provide clearer, more detailed pictures. Many of these contrast agents contain metals that have been chosen for their paramagnetic properties, including manganese, iron, or, most commonly, the rare earth metal gadolinium.

    These compounds have been carefully engineered for safety and have exemplary safety records; however, they are not completely without risk. On May 14–15, 2010, a symposium at the New York Academy of Sciences brought together researchers studying a very rare syndrome that appears to be caused by the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in individuals with severely impaired kidney function, a disorder known as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Clinicians who played seminal roles in the identification and characterization of the disease and representatives from the FDA discussed the emergence of the disease and the regulatory response.

    Use the tabs above to find a meeting report and multimedia from this event.

     

    Presentations are available from:

    Shawn Cowper (Yale School of Medicine)
    Emanuel Kanal (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center)
    Ali Abu-Alfa (Yale School of Medicine)
    Ira Krefting (U.S. Food and Drug Administration)
    Christian Bull (Northwestern University Medical School)
    Jack Gauldie (McMaster University)
    April Cox (Array Biopharma)
    Panel Discussion: Fibrosis Round Table
    Panel Discussion: Controversies in the Continued Use of GBCAs

    Image kindly donated by Shawn Cowper: Heart muscle (red) entwined in fibrous collagen (blue) from a young NSF patient (Trichrome stain).


    Sponsors

    Presented by:

    • The Yale School of Medicine
    • The New York Academy of Sciences

    Grant Support
    The project described is supported by Award Number R13DK088440 from the National Institute Of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases. The content of this program is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute Of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases or the National Institutes of Health.

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