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  • New Paradigms of Risk and Protection

    Understanding the HIV Epidemics among Gay and Bisexual Men

    New Paradigms of Risk and Protection

    Understanding the HIV Epidemics among Gay and Bisexual Men

    Special Guest Speaker: Thomas Farley (New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)Presented by the New York Academy of Sciences and The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    Reported by Nicholette Zeliadt | Posted January 28, 2013

    Overview

    Despite tremendous progress in confronting the global HIV epidemic, new HIV infections continue to increase among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) in rich and poor countries alike. The New Paradigms of Risk and Protection: Understanding the HIV Epidemics among Gay and Bisexual Men conference, presented on December 7, 2012, by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the New York Academy of Sciences, discussed the key drivers of the HIV epidemic in this population, including the biology of anal sex, the characteristics of MSM networks, and behavioral factors. The event also explored the unique challenges faced by black MSM around the world and discussed tools and initiatives that could help to turn the tide for this unresolved component of the HIV / AIDS epidemic.

    Use the tabs above to find a meeting report and multimedia from this event.

    Presentations available from:
    Stefan Baral, MD, MPH, MBA (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health)
    Chris Beyrer, MD, MPH (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health)
    Chris Collins, MPP (amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research)
    Thomas Farley, MD, MPH (New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)
    Kenneth Mayer, MD (Harvard Medical School; Fenway Health)
    Gregorio Millett, MPH (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
    Patrick Sullivan, PhD, DVM (Emory University)
    Chris Beyrer presented on behalf of Patrick Sullivan.


    Presented by

    • The New York Academy of Sciences
    • The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
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