Genome Integrity Discussion Group

Protecting the code of life.

Genome Integrity Discussion Group

Our genomes are composed of the sum total of genetic material necessary to encode the blueprint for human life. The effective maintenance of genome integrity and stability is essential for normal cell division, normal function of our tissues and organs, healthy aging, and the prevention of diseases such as cancer. The processes that regulate genome integrity maintenance include sensing, signaling, and repair of DNA damage, processing of DNA damage in the context of chromatin and chromosomes, cell cycle checkpoint control, and control of cell death. Many of the basic aspects of genome integrity—such as how cells sense and process DNA damage—are still not well understood.

Our portfolio of events and publications in Genome Integrity seek to successfully map the mechanisms by which these regulatory processes act or go awry, presenting an exciting avenue for identifying novel approaches for protecting against disease-causing errors and restoring function.



Did you know that there are between 30,000 and 40,000 genes in the human genome?  That's only twice the number of genes in a fly or worm genome!


Contact

Sonya Dougal, PhD

212.298.8683

Steering Committee Members

The Genome Integrity Discussion Group Steering Committee, composed of multi-sector and multi-institutional scientists from the Academy’s network, provides thought leadership on key issues of interest to the genome biology community, helping to inform and shape our program portfolio.

scott-keeney
Scott Keeney, PhD
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
susan-l-smith
Susan L. Smith, PhD
NYU School of Medicine
lorraine-s-symington
Lorraine S. Symington, PhD
Columbia University
sonya-dougal
Sonya Dougal, PhD
The New York Academy of Sciences
caitlin-mcomish
Caitlin McOmish, PhD
The New York Academy of Sciences