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  • Probiotic Foods and Supplements

    The Science and Regulations of Labeling

    Probiotic Foods and Supplements

    The Science and Regulations of Labeling

    Organizers: Linda Duffy (National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NIH), Tri Duong (Texas A&M University), Marguerite Klein (Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH), Dan Levy (Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. FDA), Mary Ellen Sanders (Dairy and Food Culture Technologies), and Howard Young (National Cancer Institute, NIH)Presented by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Office of Dietary Supplements at the National Institutes of Health, and the New York Academy of Sciences
    Reported by Megan Stephan | Posted October 20, 2010

    Overview

    The health properties of foods containing probiotics are receiving increased attention from consumers who are interested in improving their health by improving their diets. The identities of the microorganisms in many of these foods have been known since the 19th and 20th centuries, but with the advent of molecular biological techniques our capacity to characterize them has increased greatly. These techniques make it possible for probiotics makers to ensure the quality and safety of their products more rigorously than ever before. At the same time, the industry is receiving increased scrutiny from regulatory officials, who are charged with ensuring that these products contain what they say they do, and provide the benefits that are described on labels and in advertisements.

    On June 12, 2010, manufacturers of probiotics products, regulatory officials, microbiologists, and others with an interest in probiotics labeling met to discuss this aspect of the industry. Representatives of regulatory agencies, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission, laid out current agency guidance and discussed the precedents set by similar products in developing standards for probiotics labeling and advertising. In later sessions, microbiologists described how best to use recent scientific advances to identify and characterize the microorganisms present in probiotic foods and supplements. Such measures will provide assurance to consumers and regulatory officials alike that probiotic products contain the organisms that are described on their labels.

    Use the tabs above to find a meeting report and multimedia from this event.

     

    Presentations are available from:

    Elizabeth Rahavi (International Food Information Council)
    Kenneth M. Taylor (Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition)
    Richard L. Cleland (Federal Trade Commission)
    Geraldine A. June (U.S. Food & Drug Administration)
    Charles Franz (Max Rubner-Institut, Federal Institute of Nutrition and Food)
    Brian Beck (American Type Culture Collection)
    Duane Charbonneau (Procter & Gamble)
    Session I Panel Discussion
    Session II Panel Discussion

    Note: The views expressed by panelist Linda Duffy during the Session I discussion do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM); nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by NCCAM.


    Related Publications

    Annals

    The Science and Regulations of Probiotic Food and Supplement Product Labeling
    By Mary Ellen Sanders (Dairy and Food Culture Technologies, Centennial, Colorado) and Dan Levy (U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, Maryland)

    Annals

    Probiotics: From Bench to Market
    By Marguerite Klein (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland), Mary Ellen Sanders (Dairy and Food Culture Technologies, Centennial, Colorado), Tri Duong (Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas), and Howard A. Young (National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland)

    eBriefing

    Probiotics: From Bench to Market

    Podcast

    More than a Yogurt Cup


    Conference presented by:

    • US Food and Drug Administration
    • US Office of Dietary Supplements at the National Institute of Health
    • The New York Academy of Sciences

    eBriefing sponsored by:

    • Biocodex
    • Essential Formulas
    • Natren
    • Pharmachem Laboratories

    Note: This eBriefing is supported by individual and independent organizations. Support for this eBriefing by any one organization does not endorse the commercial practices or products of the other independent supporting organizations.

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